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" How now, Horatio? you tremble and look pale; Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. "
Recreations of a recluse [signed F.J.]. - Page 41
by F. J - 1870
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Othello As Tragedy: Some Problems of Judgement and Feeling

Jane Adamson, Adamson Jane - Drama - 1980 - 300 pages
...Othello's Til see before I doubt', with Horatio's far calmer speech (after he has actually 'seen'): 'Before my God, I might not this believe/ Without the sensible and true avouch/ Of mine own eyes' (Hamlet, i, i, 56-8). 'Alvin Kernan also remarks on this similarity in his suggestive (if selfadmittedly...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1980 - 383 pages
...? You tremble and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy ? What think you on't? HORATIO Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. MARCELLUS Is it not like the King? HORATIO As thou art to thyself. 60 Such was the very armour he had...
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Analyzing Shakespeare's Action: Scene Versus Sequence

Charles A. Hallett, Hallett Charles A, Elaine S. Hallett - Drama - 1991 - 230 pages
...appear." He soon has evidence to the contrary, and his own expression of amazement marks his reversal: "Before my God, I might not this believe / Without the sensible and true avouch / Of mine own eyes." It is the same movement from doubt to conviction that Shakespeare puts Brabantio through. The reversal...
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Otherworldly Hamlet

John O'Meara - Literary Collections - 1991 - 112 pages
...Horatio's response to the Ghost which he communicates at first to Marcellus and then to Hamlet: HOR.: Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. MAR.: Is it not like the King? 35 Hör.: As thou art to thyself. (Ii 56-59) Hon.: ...each word made...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1992 - 138 pages
...Horatio? You tremble and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on't? HORATIO Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. MARCEL. Is it not like the King? HORATIO As thou art to thyself. Such was the very armour he had on,...
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The Winter's Tale

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 151 pages
...possible scepticism in the reader or spectator. In Hamlet, after seeing the Ghost, Horatio says: Afore my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes.12 Centuries later, the narrator of Conrad's Lord Jim speaks of '[t]his astounding adventure,...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare, Russell Jackson - Performing Arts - 1996 - 208 pages
...Horatio? You tremble and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on't? HORATIO Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. MARCELLUS Is it not like the King? HORATIO recovers with some help from BARNARDO's hip flask. HORATIO...
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The Unmasking of Drama: Contested Representation in Shakespeare's Tragedies

Jonathan Baldo - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 213 pages
...scene (1.2.257-58). And the skeptical Horatio, when converted to belief, swears, "Before my God, 1 might not this believe / Without the sensible and true avouch /Of mine own eyes" (1.1 .59-6 1 ) . By the end of the opening act, eye and ear are polarized within a single character,...
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The First Quarto of Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 144 pages
...tremble and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on't? 45 HORATIO Afore my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of my own eyes. MARCELLUS Is it not like the king? HORATIO As thou art to thyself. Such was the very armour...
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Deadly Thought: Hamlet and the Human Soul

Jan H. Blits - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 405 pages
...something more than fantasy? What think you on't? (1.1.56-58) And Horatio, swearing by God, agrees: Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. (1.1.59-61) Horatio contradicts himself. Even as he proclaims that his belief rests on the witness...
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