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" How now, Horatio? you tremble and look pale; Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. "
Recreations of a recluse [signed F.J.]. - Page 41
by F. J - 1870
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1854
...? you tremble, and look pale: Is not this something more than fantasy ? What think you of it ? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Jl/ar. Is it not like the king? Hor. As thou art to thyself: Such was the very armour he had on, When...
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Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire ..., Volumes 7-8

Cheshire (England) - 1855
...take hold of him, Touching Uiis dreaded sight twice seen of us ;" and he himself afterwards says, " I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes." And when this unbelief of his has proved to be foolishness, he is full of the philosophy of the schools,...
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The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1856
...you tremble, and look pale: Is not this something more than fantasy ? What think you on 't ? Ilor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Mar. Is it not like the king? Ilor. As thou art to thyself: Such was the very armour he had on, When...
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The Stratford Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight, Volumes 17-22

William Shakespeare - 1856
...Horatio? you tremble, and look pale: I; not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? HOR. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. HAB. Is it not like the king? BOB. As thou art to thyself : Soch was the very armour he had on, When...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...Horatio ! you tremble and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy 1 What think you on't ? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Mar. Is it not like the king 1 Hor. As thou art to thyself. Such was the very armour he had on, When...
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Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire ..., Volume 8

Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire - Cheshire (England) - 1856
...take hold of him, Touching this dreaded sight twice seen of us ;" and he himself afterwards says, " I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes." And when this unbelief of his has proved to be foolishness, he is full of the philosophy of the schools,...
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Shakespeare's Hamlet, herausg. von K. Elze

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 272 pages
...Horatio! you tremble, and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. • Mar. Is it not like the king? Hor. As thou art to thyself. Such was the very armour he had on,...
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1857
...? you tremble and look pale : Is not this something more than fantasy ? What think you on 't ? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Mar. Is it not like the king? Hor. As thou art to thyself: Such was the very armor he had on, When...
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1858
...! you tremble, and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy ? What think you on't ? Ilor. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Mar. Is it not like the king ? Ilor. As thou art to thyself. Such was the very armour he had on, When...
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A GLOSSARY

ROBERT NARES, A.M., F.R.S., F.A.S., - 1859
...commaund, The peuple be avoyded from the bridge. AVOUCH, *. Proof; testimony. Taylor's Wartet, 1680. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Shakespeare uses avouchment also. AVOUEE, . Confession ; acknowledgment. Of mine own eyes. Sam.,...
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