Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" How now, Horatio? you tremble and look pale; Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. "
Recreations of a recluse [signed F.J.]. - Page 41
by F. J - 1870
Full view - About this book

The Works of William Shakespeare: Macbeth. Hamlet. King Lear. Othello ...

William Shakespeare - 1866
...! you tremble, and look pale : Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on't ? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Mar. Is it not like the king ? Hor. As thou art to thyself: Such was the very armour he had on When...
Full view - About this book

The Spiritual Magazine, Volume 1

Spiritualism - 1866
...a sceptic at the spirit-circle, when confronted with the reality he had denied, he asseverates — Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes 1 Though the soldiers at the first appearance of the Ghost are distilled Almost to jelly with the act...
Full view - About this book

The Congregational Review, Volume 6

Congregationalism - 1866
...slight variation, both employ this form of solemn affirmation, "before my God." " Before my God, I could not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes." Act I., sc. I., 1. 56-57. " 'Fore God, my lord, well spoken, with good accent and good discretion."...
Full view - About this book

Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 61

Literature - 1867
...tract of everything; Would by a good discourser lose some life, "Which action's self was tongue to.J To apply Horatio's exclamation : Before my God, I...brutality to the gentle lady married to that Moor : * Twelfth Night, Act III. Sc. 4. t A Winter's Tale, Act HI. Sc. 8. J King Henry VUI., Act I. Sc....
Full view - About this book

The Stratford Shakspere: Romeo & Juliet. Timon of Athens. Hamlet. King Lear ...

William Shakespeare - 1867
...Horatio? you tremble, and look pale: Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on't? HOR. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. MAR. Is it not like the king? HOR. As thou art to thyself : Such was the very armour he had on, When...
Full view - About this book

The Pictorial edition of the works of Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight. [8 vols ...

William Shakespeare - 1867
...yon tremble, antl look pale : Is not this some! hing more than fantasy ? What think you on Ч ? llor. 4 6 5 #i0 5f1 7 7 7)4,*-* / ' 0 0 6 4 5?7@7/% ! %7 7 6 2 . ! 5 ' 4 4 5 4 7 7 7 7 1 6 1 1 4 7 Mar. Is it not like the king ? Hor. As thou art to thyself : Such was the very armour he had on, When...
Full view - About this book

A Dictionary of the Language of Shakespeare

Swynfen Jervis - 1868 - 374 pages
...leave him. Antony and Cleopatra, v. 2. Avoid the gallery. Henry 8, v. 1. AVOUCH. Testimony; evidence. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch, Of mine own eyes. Hamlet, i 1. To AVOUCH. To declare; to affirm; to assert; to maintain. Is this well spoken ? — I...
Full view - About this book

Shakspeare's Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 1868 - 307 pages
...Horatio! you tremble, and look pale. Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe, ' Without...the sensible and true avouch -' Of mine own eyes.! •'-: "* I'-i ' :-.-.1 T ..;• Mar. r-,: •,-.- Is.it not like the king? > .:'.' Hor. As thou art...
Full view - About this book

A Dictionary of the Language of Shakspeare, Volume 70

Swynfen Jervis - 1868 - 374 pages
...leave him. Antony and Cleopatra, v. 2. Avoid the gallery. Henry 8, v. 1. AVOUCH. Testimony; evidence. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes. Hamlet, i. 1. To AVOUCH. To declare; to affirm; to assert; to maintain. Is this well spoken ? — I...
Full view - About this book

On the Principles of Grammar

Edward Thirng - 1868
...court it in a shape of heaven. p. 253. There be, an if there might, p. 257. Condition implied. Sc. 1. Before my God, I might not this believe, Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own yes. p. 231. SC. 5. But that I am forbid .... I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word Wnuld harrow...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF