Dominion and Agency: Copyright and the Structuring of the Canadian Book Trade, 1867-1918

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Oct 8, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 224 pages

The 1867 Canadian confederation brought with it expectations of a national literature, which a rising class of local printers hoped to supply. Reforming copyright law in the imperial context proved impossible, and Canada became a prime market for foreign publishers instead. The subsequent development of the agency system of exclusive publisher-importers became a defining feature of Canadian trade publishing for most of the twentieth century.

In Dominion and Agency, Eli MacLaren analyses the struggle for copyright reform and the creation of a national literature using previously ignored archival sources such as the Board of Trade Papers at the National Archives of the United Kingdom. A groundbreaking study, Dominion and Agency is an important exploration of the legal and economic structures that were instrumental in the formation of today's Canadian literary culture.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Principles of Copyright
The London Publishers Prevail
The Stunting of Belford Brothers
William Briggs Printer Binder and Distributor
5 The 1900 Amendment the Agency System and the Macmillan Company of Canada
Black Rock and the Magnification of Ralph Connor
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Studies in Book and Print Culture
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Eli MacLaren is an assistant professor in the Department of English at McGill University.

Bibliographic information