The Turn of Midnight

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MIRA, Aug 27, 2019 - Fiction - 416 pages
The compelling, taut and suspenseful conclusion to The Last Hours

As the year 1349 approaches, the Black Death continues its devastating course across England. In Dorseteshire, the quarantined people of Develish question whether they are the only survivors.

Guided by their beloved young mistress, Lady Anne, they wait, knowing that when their dwindling stores are finally gone they will have no choice but to leave. But where will they find safety in the desolate wasteland outside?

One man has the courage to find out.

Thaddeus Thurkell, a freethinking, educated serf, strikes out in search of supplies and news. A compelling leader, he and his companions quickly throw off the shackles of serfdom and set their minds to ensuring Develish's future--and freedom for its people.

But what use is freedom that cannot be gained lawfully? When Lady Anne and Thaddeus conceive an audacious plan to secure her people's independence, neither foresees the life-threatening struggle over power, money and religion that follows...

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - labdaddy4 - LibraryThing

An interesting, light, but fun read. This is a sequel (or continuation) of the story begun in "The Last Hours" - which needs to be read first due to character development and storyline. The author is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - smik - LibraryThing

This is the sequel of THE LAST HOURS. It is some time since Lady Anne's husband died outside the walls of his estate from the Black Death. Since then no one has been allowed to enter the walls of ... Read full review

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About the author (2019)

British mystery writer Minette Walters began her literary career as a sub-editor at a romance publishing company. She wrote short stories and romance novels for a time before turning to writing mysteries. Her first mystery novel, The Ice House (1992), won the John Creasy Award for Best First Novel. Later novels have also been award winners. Scold's Bridle won a CWA Gold Dagger and The Sculptress (which was made into a BBC television play) won an Edgar Award.

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