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" What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd. "
The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners: With Strictures on Their ... - Page 404
1802
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The Ethics of Mourning: Grief and Responsibility in Elegiac Literature

R. Clifton Spargo - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 314 pages
...self-remembrance, Hamlet disdains food precisely as a signifier of our too limited human dimension, crying "What is a man / If his chief good and market of his.../ Be but to sleep and feed? — a beast, no more" (4.4. [c.23-25]).25 Indeed Hamlet's disdain for food and for our beastly being is tied closely to his...
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Subjectivity

Donald Eugene Hall, Donald E. (West Virginia University Hall, USA) - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 144 pages
...attempts to think his way into action, and to pinpoint and address deficiencies in his self. He muses, "What is a man/ If his chief good and market of his time/Be but to sleep and feed?" (Shakespeare 1992: 203). Like Descartes, Hamlet recognizes that "man"...
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Hesitant Heroes: Private Inhibition, Cultural Crisis

Professor Emeritus of German and Comparative Literature Theodore Ziolkowski, Theodore Ziolkowski - Social Science - 2004 - 163 pages
...concerns him. The keywords are still intellectual: "reason," "thinking," "thought," "wisdom," and "cause." What is a man, If his chief good and market of his urne Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking...
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Playwriting: A Practical Guide

NoŽl Greig - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2005 - 204 pages
...language. THE STRUGGLE FOR ARTICULACY How all occasions do inform against me, And spur my dull revenge! What is a man, If his chief good and market of his...more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, * [Intelligence]* Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust*...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 896 pages
...Guildenstem and the rest pass on How all occasions do inform against me, And spur my dull revenge! What is a man, If his chief good and market of his...more: Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unused. Now,...
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Shakespeare

George Ian Duthie - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 206 pages
...apprehension, how like a god: the beauty of the world; the paragon of animals; . . . .J (II,ii,3i6ff.) What is a man, If his chief good and market of his...more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unused. (IV,...
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Reassessing American Culture: A Rebel's Guide

Gregory Shafer - History - 2005 - 128 pages
...Revolutionary Spirit of America." The Sun April 2005: 412. Chapter One Media and Men: The Making of a Jackass What is a man if his chief good and market of his time be but to sleep and feed a beast, no more. -Hamlet Act IV, Scene 4 This chapter begins on the pages of the August 2004 issue of Maxim. In understanding...
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Shakespeare and the Lawyers

O. Hood Phillips - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 214 pages
...order. This tradition is seen by Richard O'Sullivan5 to be reflected by Shakespeare in the passage : What is a man, if his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? A beast no more. Since He that made us with such large discourse Looking before and after, gave us not That capability...
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Allegories of One's Own Mind: Melancholy in Victorian Poetry

David G. Riede - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 226 pages
...(138). For both eras the futility of human endeavor produced the dilemma of the dispirited Hamlet: "What is a man / If his chief good and market of his...time / Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more" (138, and see Hamlet IV.iv.33-35). Again seeming to describe Victorian England as much as Lutheran...
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Augustine and Literature

Robert Peter Kennedy, Kim Paffenroth, John Doody - Biography & Autobiography - 2006 - 414 pages
...example this passage from the soliloquy beginning "How all occasions do inform against me" (IV.iv.32-66): What is a man, If his chief good and market of his...more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and godlike reason To fust in us unus'd. (33-39)...
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