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" To live beneath your more habitual sway. I love the Brooks, which down their channels fret, Even more than when I tripped lightly as they... "
Poems - Page 355
by William Wordsworth - 1815
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Corresponding Powers: Studies in Honour of Professor Hisaaki Yamanouchi

Hisaaki Yamanouchi - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...from "the westward of a summer's night" might it not be pink rather than silver? Or even red and black ("clouds that gather round the setting sun / Do take a sober colouring")? Leaving that aside, would windows, even in the most enchanted of castles be likely to resemble "a beauteous...
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The Time of Unrememberable Being: Wordsworth and the Sublime, 1787-1805

Klaus P. Mortensen - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 200 pages
...and emanates light from a sphere beyond the earthly: The Clouds that gather round the setting sun,7" Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality; (PW IV p.285 verse XI) This eye is not the sensing, visionary human eye that colours what it sees,...
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Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture: Discourse and Ideology

Antony H. Harrison - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 189 pages
...Shepherd boy," but for him nonetheless (William The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Wordsworth, Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality. By contrast, Rossetti's speaker rejects as a "foolish fancy" the desire for liberation from self-imprisonment...
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Portraits of American Continental Philosophers

James R. Watson - Philosophy - 1999 - 228 pages
...the darker side of William Wordsworth's famous ode, selecting these lines as an epigraph to the book: The clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take...an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality. A later book on Heidegger, Daimon Life: Heidegger and Life-Philosophy (1992), did not entirely surrender...
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The Poetics of Disappointment: Wordsworth to Ashbery

Literary Criticism
...anticipates and accepts the prospect of a darkened existence, permanently "subdued" and "chastened": The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take...an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality. (i97-99) Once again, he identifies his new role as that of the witness or observer, a passive role...
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Light-Gathering Poems

Liz Rosenberg - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2000 - 146 pages
...your might; I only have relinquished one delight To live beneath your more habitual sway. I love the Brooks which down their channels fret, Even more than...that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober coloring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality; Another race hath been, and other palms...
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Men in Wonderland: The Lost Girlhood of the Victorian Gentlemen

Catherine Robson - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 250 pages
...195-96), he is clearly in emotional harmony not with the day's beginning, but the day's end, where "The Clouds that gather round the setting sun / Do take a sober colouring" (1l. 19798). Significantly, the narrator in the Ode is watching and describing not his own childhood...
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Collected Works of Richard Claverhouse Jebb, Volume 2

Richard Claverhouse Jebb - Philosophy - 2002 - 3741 pages
...also inseparable from those aspirations of his own mind which he read into the scenes around him : — The clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take...mortality: Another race hath been, and other palms are won. The natural affinity of Keats with the Greek mind is curiously illustrated by a letter to a friend,...
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Shelley Among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language

Stuart Peterfreund - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 406 pages
...is won by the individual who lives a seasonable, heartfelt life under Nature's "more habitual sway": "Another race hath been, and other palms are won. /Thanks to the human heart by which we live" (WPW, 11.192, 200-201). To live such a life is to cultivate "the philosophic mind" (1. 187) that comes...
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William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2003 - 48 pages
...your might; I only have relinquished one delight To live beneath your more habitual sway. I love the Brooks which down their channels fret, Even more than...setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye O . .* That hath kept watch o'er man's mor tali t Another race hath been, and other palms are -vvorT...
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