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" Why should that name be sounded more than yours ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar. "
The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with additional notes - Page 146
by William Shakespeare - 1856
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ` Cxsar: what should be in that Cassar? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together,...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...likeness, and then of a difference, between himself and Caesar. 'Brutus and Caesar,' argues Cassius, / 'What should be in that "Caesar"? / Why should that...together, yours is as fair a name; / Sound them, it does become the mouth as well' (142-5). In the same way, although without the same calculation, the...
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
...encodes the data of ancestry and behavior which a Roman should embody. H Let Cassius focus the argument: Brutus and Caesar. What should be in that "Caesar"?...name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em. "Brutus" will start a spirit as soon as "Caesar." Only,...
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Words on Words: Quotations about Language and Languages

David Crystal, Hilary Crystal - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 580 pages
...name. William Shakespeare, 1597, The Merry Wives of Windsor, II. ii. 283 45:78 [Cassius, to Brutus] Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?...name. / Sound them: it doth become the mouth as well, / Weigh them: it is as heavy. William Shakespeare, 1599, Julius Caesar, I. ii. 143 45:79 JAQUES: Rosalind...
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The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 114 pages
...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. HO Men at sometime were masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is...Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that "Caesar"? 144 Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together: yours is as fair a name....
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Orson Welles on Shakespeare: The W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre Playscripts

Orson Welles - Performing Arts - 2001 - 297 pages
...Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about 1 14 Orson Welles on Shakespeare To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are...name. Sound them: it doth become the mouth as well. Now in the names of all the gods at once, Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed That he is grown...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...narrow world / Like a Colossus, and we petty men / Walk under his huge legs, and peep about / To find ourselves dishonourable graves. / Men at some time...underlings. / Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that En una obra cargada de magníficas ironías, el verso más irónico es tal vez "«Bruto» llamará...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - Business & Economics - 2002 - 320 pages
...on his side. To put a stop to Caesar's ambition, Cassius, ironically, appeals to Brutus's ambition: Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault,...'Caesar'? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? JULIUS CAESAR (1.2, 137-41) You, too, can be a star! How many times have managers used words similar...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1989 - 1280 pages
...the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find rection. — As I intend to thrive in this new world,...true appeal: Besides, I heard the banisht Norfolk Caîsar: what should be in that Ca-sar? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them...
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Shakespeare's Tragic Skepticism

Millicent Bell - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 283 pages
...something destined, and comparing Caesar to Brutus, he says, The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars But in ourselves, that we are underlings. "Brutus"..."Caesar"? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? — and reminds Brutus of his namesake and ancestor, the founder of the Roman republic in 509 BC, whose...
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