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" Why should that name be sounded more than yours ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar. "
The works of William Shakspere. Knight's Cabinet ed., with additional notes - Page 146
by William Shakespeare - 1856
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
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The Tragedies

William Shakespeare, George Rylands - English drama - 1959 - 1362 pages
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Words on Words: Quotations about Language and Languages

David Crystal, Hilary Crystal - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 580 pages
...name. William Shakespeare, 1597, The Merry Wives of Windsor, II. ii. 283 45:78 [Cassius, to Brutus] Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?...name. / Sound them: it doth become the mouth as well, / Weigh them: it is as heavy. William Shakespeare, 1599, Julius Caesar, I. ii. 143 45:79 JAQUES: Rosalind...
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The Tragedy of Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 114 pages
...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. HO Men at sometime were masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is...Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that "Caesar"? 144 Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together: yours is as fair a name....
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Orson Welles on Shakespeare: The W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre Playscripts

Orson Welles - Performing Arts - 2001 - 297 pages
...Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about 1 14 Orson Welles on Shakespeare To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are...name. Sound them: it doth become the mouth as well. Now in the names of all the gods at once, Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed That he is grown...
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Arden Shakespeare Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 1347 pages
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...narrow world / Like a Colossus, and we petty men / Walk under his huge legs, and peep about / To find ourselves dishonourable graves. / Men at some time...underlings. / Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that En una obra cargada de magníficas ironías, el verso más irónico es tal vez "«Bruto» llamará...
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The Arden Shakespeare Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1998 - 1344 pages
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Shakespeare for One: Men : the Complete Monologues and Audition Pieces

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2002 - 298 pages
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - Business & Economics - 2002 - 320 pages
...on his side. To put a stop to Caesar's ambition, Cassius, ironically, appeals to Brutus's ambition: Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault,...'Caesar'? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? JULIUS CAESAR (1.2, 137-41) You, too, can be a star! How many times have managers used words similar...
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