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" That, wisely doating, ask'd not why it doated, And ours the unknown joy, which knowing kills. But now I find, how dear thou wert to me; That man is more than half of nature's treasure. Of that fair Beauty which no eye can see, Of that sweet music which... "
Poems - Page 1
by Hartley Coleridge - 1833 - 157 pages
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 24

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell, Henry T. Steele - American periodicals - 1851
...mind, one heart devoted, That wisely doating, asked not why it doatcd, And ours the unknown joy that knowing kills. But now I find how dear thou wert to...can measure ; — And now the streams may sing for other's pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity." (Vol. ip 5.) To this period belongs the fragment...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 31

1851
...mind, one heart devoted, That, wisely doating, asked not why it doated, And ours the unknown joy that knowing kills. But now I find how dear thou wert to...eye can see, Of that sweet music which no ear can mensure ; — And now the streams may sing for others' pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity....
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Hausschatz englischer Poesie: Auswahl aus den Werken der bedeutendsten ...

Oskar Ludweg Beruhard Wolff - English poetry - 1852 - 399 pages
...Coleridge. One soul was oars, one mind, one heart devoted, •, That, wisely doting, asked not why it doted, And ours the unknown joy, which knowing "kills. But...ear can measure; And now the streams may sing for other's pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity. In the great city we are met again, Where many...
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The Free Church Magazine.january-December 1852.New Series.-VOL.I

The Free Church Magazine.january-December 1852.New Series.-VOL.I - 1852
...beholding it, will, in visiting it again, be compelled, no doubt, to assent to his own beautiful lines, "|That man Is more than half of nature's treasure,...see, Of that sweet music which no ear can measure. 4 * The bane of Hartley Coleridge's life, the worm that gnawed at the root of all his happiness, was...
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Lives of the Illustrious, Volumes 1-2

1856
...hills, To sweet accord subdued our wayward wills. One soul was ours, one mind, one heart devoted, Tbat, wisely doating, ask'd not why it doated ; And ours...others' pleasure. The hills sleep on in their eternity. After a two years' residence in London, it became apparent to his friends that his continuance there...
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Studies in English poetry [an anthology] with biogr. sketches and notes by J ...

Joseph Payne - 1856
...devoted, That, wisely doting,1 asked not why it doted, And ours the unknown joy, which knowing kills.2 But now I find how dear thou wert to me ; That man...others' pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity ! Hartley Coleridge. THE DEATH-BED. WE watched her breathing through the night, Her breathing soft...
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Beautiful poetry, selected by the ed. of The Critic, Volume 6

Beautiful poetry - 1859
...wills: One soul was ours, one mind, one heart devoted, That wisely doting, asked not why it doted, And ours the unknown joy, which knowing kills. But...others' pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity ! METRICAL FEET. • By COLERIDGE. TROCHEE trips from long to short; From long to long, in solemn sort,...
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Studies in English poetry [an anthology] with biogr. sketches and notes by J ...

Joseph Payne - 1859
...wills : One soul was ours, one mind, one heart devoted, That, wisely doting,1 asked not why it doted, And ours the unknown joy, which knowing kills.* But...which no eye can see, Of that sweet music which no eye can measure; And now the streams may sing for others' pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 1; Volume 64

1865
...subdued our wayward wills : One soul was ours, one mind, one heart devoted, That, wisely doating, asked not why it doated, And ours the unknown joy, which...which no eye can see, Of that sweet music which no car can measure ; And now the streams may sing for others' pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity."...
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Tinsley's Magazine, Volume 23

English fiction - 1878
...And ours the unknown joy, which knowing kills. Bat now I find how dear thou wert to me ; That rnan is more than half of Nature's treasure, Of that fair...others pleasure, The hills sleep on in their eternity.' We wish to call attention to the use here made of the feminine or dissyllabic rhymes, so seldom used...
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