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" I was not much afeard ; for once or twice I was about to speak and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage but Looks on alike. "
Tremaine: Or, The Man of Refinement - Page 142
by Robert Plumer Ward - 1825
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1858
...fo. 1632 : there could be no doubt about the right word. I was about to speak, and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court, Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. — Will't please you, sir, be gone ? [To FLORIZEL. I told you, what would come of...
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The Poacher, and Other Pictures of Country Life

Thomas Miller - Country life - 1858 - 328 pages
...wherein he says, " I was not much afeard ; for once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him plainly, The self-same sun, that shines upon his court, Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on all alike." Who ever saw a rural feast without flowers ? What gay nosegays do the villagers...
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The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an Introductory Essay ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1858
...afraid; for once oŁ twice ,• "'. I was iihuut to speak, and tell him plainly, . . The self -same sun, that shines upon his court, Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. Wilt please you, Sir, be gone 1 (To Florizel.) '. I told you, what would come of this....
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A Critical History of English Literature: Shakespeare to Milton, Volume 2

David Daiches - 1979 - 289 pages
...mean-spirited and selfish, has not the tragic overtones of Leontes' jealousy. Besides, Perdita knows that The self-same sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on all alike. So the couple flee to Sicily, where Leontes receives them kindly until Polixenes...
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Hamlet and Other Shakespearean Essays

L. C. Knights, Lionel Charles Knights - Literary Criticism - 1979 - 308 pages
...echo of Perdita's I was not much afeard; for once or twice I was about to speak and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. As for the final scene, obviously it is possible to see it as a conventional happy...
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The Woman's Part: Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare

Carolyn Ruth Swift Lenz, Gayle Greene, Carol Thomas Neely - Feminism and literature - 1980 - 348 pages
...of the upright moral maiden. Finally, after Polixenes unmasks, her generalization about humanity — "The selfsame sun that shines upon his court / Hides not his visage from our cottage" (448-49) — indicates a view that all people are basically equal. Her comment courageously contrasts...
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Things Supernatural and Causeless: Shakespearean Romance

Marco Mincoff - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 131 pages
...she maintains, I was not much afeard; for once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him plainly The self-same sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. . . . (4.4.442-46) It is also evident in the frankness with which she speaks of her...
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Shakespeare's Monarchies: Ruler and Subject in the Romances

Constance Jordan - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 224 pages
...adds: I was not much afeard: for once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him [Polixenes] plainly The self-same sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. (4.4.442-46) Perdita 's figure of the equalizing sun has a history as popular metaphor....
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Shakespeare Stories II

Leon Garfield - Juvenile Fiction - 1995 - 284 pages
...bravely. "I was not much afeared," she said, "for once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him plainly the self-same sun that shines upon his court, hides not his visage from our cottage, but It was the King! looks on alike. Will't please you, sir, be gone?" she begged the Prince. "I told you...
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Four Late Plays

William Shakespeare - 1998 - 410 pages
...Even here, undone, I was not much afeard: for once or twice I was about to speak and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. [to Florizet] Will't please you, sir, be gone? I told you what would come of this:...
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