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" I was not much afeard ; for once or twice I was about to speak and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage but Looks on alike. "
Tremaine: Or, The Man of Refinement - Page 142
by Robert Plumer Ward - 1825
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The Life and Death of King Richard II

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...idea, contrast Mowbray's depreciation of "the common air" (1. 159) and compare Tale IV. iv.455 — "The self-same sun that shines upon his court, Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks upon all alike." Also the passage from Lyly's Euphues quoted on ll. 266h-i, and the following...
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Lectures Upon Shakspeare

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
...I was not much afraid; for once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him plainly, The self- same sun, that shines upon his court, Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. Wilt please you, Sir, be gone ! (To Florizel) I told you, what would come of this....
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 236 pages
...says of the king: I was not much afeard, for once or twice I was about to speak and tell him plainly The selfsame sun that shines upon his Court Hides not his visage from our cottage but Looks on alike. (1v, iv, 443-7) Echoed here is a verse in Matthew (v, 45) about a Father in heaven...
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Shakespeare's Last Plays: Essays in Literature and Politics

Stephen W. Smith, Travis Curtright - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 244 pages
...paradoxically makes their virtue more striking: Perdita's candid recognition that she is the equal of Polixenes ('The selfsame sun that shines upon his court / Hides not his visage from our cottage" [The Winter's Tale, 4.4.446-47]), Marina's speeches to her customers, especially to the governor of...
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Reading Adoption: Family and Difference in Fiction and Drama

Marianne Novy - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 292 pages
...sometimes associated with the subversive voice of the bastard: I was about to speak, and tell him plainly The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. (4.4.443-46) Yet her occasional alliance with nature leaves many social and cultural...
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Shakespeare's Heroines

Anna Murphy Jameson - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 464 pages
...here undone! I was not much afeard: for once, or twice, I was about to speak; and tell him plainly The self-same sun, that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. Will 't please you, Sir, be gone? I told you what would come of this. Beseech you,...
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Designing Video and Multimedia for Open and Flexible Learning

Fitzroy Pyle, Jack Koumi - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 237 pages
...carries her towards the democratic conclusion: once or twice I was about to speak, and tell him plainly, The selfsame sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. (443) But, poised between the two extremes, she is swayed by her native conservatism...
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Stanley Cavell's American Dream: Shakespeare, Philosophy, and Hollywood Movies

Lawrence F. Rhu - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 248 pages
...that's just the way of saying it requires a change of heart, even for the king. As Perdita puts it, The self-same sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on all alike (4.4.442-46). In today's idiom Leontes is not exactly a "deadbeat dad," but there...
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Cavendish and Shakespeare: Interconnections

Katherine Romack, James Fitzmaurice - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 217 pages
...to Florizel: "I was not much afeard: for once or twice/ I was about to speak, and tell him plainly/ The self-same sun that shines upon his court/ Hides not his visage from our cottage, but/ Looks on alike" (IV.iv .442-46). becomes jealouse, although she doth this for his sake, and to keep...
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Infirm Glory: Shakespeare and the Renaissance Image of Man

Sukanta Chaudhuri - Didactic drama, English - 1981 - 231 pages
...un-proletarian fire: I was not much afeard; for once or twice 1 was about to speak and tell him plainly The self-same sun that shines upon his court Hides not his visage from our cottage, but Looks on alike. (IV. iv. 434-8) any inborn virtue at all? More profoundly, if the lost princess Perdita...
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