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" mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By lakes and sandy shores, beneath the crags Of ancient mountain, and beneath the clouds Which image in their bulk both lakes and shores And... "
Poems - Page 145
by Hartley Coleridge - 1833 - 157 pages
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The English poets, selections, ed. by T.H. Ward. Wordsworth to Dobell ...

Thomas Humphry Ward - 1883
...was reared In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in Himself. Great universal Teacher! He shall mould Thy spirit, and by giving make it ask. Therefore all seasons...
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Wordsworth to Dobell

Thomas Humphry Ward - English poetry - 1884
...was reared In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in Himself. Great universal Teacher! He shall mould Thy spirit, and by giving make it ask. Therefore all seasons...
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The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With a Prefatory Notice, Biographical ...

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1884 - 294 pages
...was reared In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. Great universal Teacher ! he shall mould Thy spirit, and by giving make it ask. Therefore all seasons...
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The poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, with a prefatory notice, by J. Skipsey

Samuel Taylor [poetical works] Coleridge - 1884
...was reared In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim, And saw nought lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe ! shalt wander like a breeze By...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. Great universal Teacher ! he shall mould Thy spirit, and by giving make it ask. Therefore all seasons...
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The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Volume 4, The Eighteenth Century

George Alexander Kennedy, H. B. Nisbet, Claude Rawson, Raman Selden - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 970 pages
...world of nature to which Coleridge desires his infant son to have access in 'Frost at Midnight' (1798): so shalt thou see and hear The lovely shapes and sounds...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. (1l. 58-62) For Akenside as for Coleridge (writing more than fifty years later, and before German transcendentalist...
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Romanticism and Anthony Trollope: A Study in the Continuities of Nineteenth ...

L. J. Swingle - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 299 pages
...he envisions for his son. Hartley will wander like a breeze through the natural world, learning to "see and hear / The lovely shapes and sounds intelligible...teach / Himself in all, and all things in himself (58-62). Wordsworth, less scholastic in his tastes, likes to toy with the idea that nature might let...
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The Columbia Granger's Dictionary of Poetry Quotations

Edith P. Hazen - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 1132 pages
...reign o'er sewers and sinks, The river Rhine, it is well known, Doth wash your city of Cologne; 15 Love all, trust a few. Do wrong to none. Be able...Under thy own life's key. Be checked for silence (1. 60—63) 16 Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee. Whether the summer clothe the general...
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The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism

Stuart Curran, Cambridge University Press, University of Cambridge - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 311 pages
...have an upbringing far different from his own childhood "In the great city, pent 'mid cloisters dim": But thou, my babe! shalt wander like a breeze By lakes...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. (54-62) Coleridge might seem to come close here to Wordsworth's conviction in the preface to Lyrical...
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Coleridge and Textual Instability: The Multiple Versions of the Major Poems

Jack Stillinger - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 272 pages
...thou see and hear The lovely shapes and sounds intelligible eo Of that eternal language, which ihy God Utters, who from eternity doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. Great universal Teacher! he shall mould Thy spirit, and by giving make it ask. 65 Therefore all seasons...
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R.S. Thomas: Conceding an Absence : Images of God Explored

E. Shepherd - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1996 - 216 pages
...Romantics as he offers yet another way of reading nature. We are reminded, perhaps, of Coleridge:20 so shalt thou see and hear The lovely shapes and sounds...doth teach Himself in all, and all things in himself. Or maybe of Wordsworth:21 And I have felt A presence that disturbs me with the joy Of elevated thoughts;...
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