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" SOME in their discourse desire rather commendation of wit in being able to hold all arguments than of judgment in discerning what is true, as if it were a praise to know what might be said and not what should be thought. "
Auntient lere, a selection of aphoristical and preceptive passages from the ... - Page 51
by Ancient learning - 1812
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1825
...gire a passport to faith ; but it ought rather to kindle it to discharge itself. XXXII. OF DISCOURSE. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation of wit, in being able to hold all arguments, than cf judgment, in discerning what is true ; as if it were a praise to know what might be said, and not...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1825
...discourse desire rather commendation of wit in be in? able to hold all arguments, then of Judgement in discerning what is true, as if it were a praise to know what might be saiu, and not what ahold be thought. Some haue certain common places and Theames wherein they are good,...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Volume 11, Part 1

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...júncas went. Unknowing whom the sacred sibyl meant. Drydcn. To manage ; to handle intellectually. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...arguments, than of judgment in discerning what is true. Bacon. Great souls By nature half divine, soar to the stars And hold a near acquaintance with the gods....
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science ..., Volume 11

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...; /Eneas went, Unknowing whom the sacred sibyl meant. Drydm. To manage ; to handle intellectually. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...arguments, than of judgment in discerning what is trae. lianm. Great souls By nature half divine, snar to the stars And hold a Dear acquaintance with...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science ..., Volume 11

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...Unknowing whom the sacred sibyl meant. Drfdm. To manage ; to handle intellectually. Some in their discoune desire rather commendation of wit, in being able to...arguments, than of judgment in discerning what is true. Bacon. Great souls By nature half divine, soar to the stars And hold a near acquaintance with the gods....
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The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful ..., Volume 3

1834
...in counsel it is good to see dangers, and in execution not to see them, except they be very great. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...arguments, than of judgment in discerning what is right: as if it were a praise to know what must be said, and not what should be thought. It is a strange...
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The Works of Lord Bacon: With an Introductory Essay, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1838 - 832 pages
...give a passport to faith ; but it ought rather to kindle it to discharge itself. XXXII. OF DISCOURSE. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...and not what should be thought. Some have certain common-places and themes, wherein they are good, and want variety : which kind of poverty is for the...
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The Book of Symbols: A Series of Seventy-five Short Essays on Morals ...

Robert Mushet - Ethics, Ancient - 1847 - 506 pages
...truth. What can be proved is to him of higher importance than what is true. Lord Bacon somewhere says, " Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...what might be said, and not what should be thought." Recollect this, that in reading there " are some books to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: With a ..., Volume 1

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1848
...aubtill, natural philosophy deep, Morall graue, Lugick and Rheloricke, able to contend. OF DISCOURSE. Bone In their discourse desire rather commendation of wit In being able to hold all arguments, then of iudgement in discerning what is true, as if it were a praise to know what might be said, and...
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Works, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1850
...give a passport to faith ; but it ought rather to kindle it to discharge itself. XXXII. OF DISCOURSE. Some in their discourse desire rather commendation...and not what should be thought. Some have certain common-places and themes, wherein they are good, and want variety : which kind of poverty is for the...
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