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" Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; it is what 'eye hath not seen, ear not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive'. "
Notes on Aristophanes and Plato - Page 127
by Thomas Gray - 1884 - 4 pages
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1876 - 768 pages
...that wants either of them will be but little the better for anything else. LOCKE. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not. LOCKE. The variety and contrary choices that men nake in the world argue that the same thing is not...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With the Notes and Illustrations of ...

John Locke - 1879 - 722 pages
...farther asked, what it ia moves desire ? I answer, Happiness, and that alone. " Happiness" and "misery" are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not : it is what " eye hath not seen, ear bath not heard, nor bath it entered into the heart of man to...
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes. Authors, 544 ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1880 - 772 pages
...that wants either of them will be but little the belter for anything else. LOCKE. Happiness and misery igion, are such as human ingenuity could never have invented ; theref LOCKE. The variety and contrary choices that men nake in the world argue that the same thing is not...
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The Works of Thomas Gray in Prose and Verse: Notes on Aristophanes and Plato

Thomas Gray - 1885 - 428 pages
...dissolution of that symmetry and harmony in our fabrick, which is the cause of health, strength, &e. as pleasure results 1 Happiness and misery, says Mr....1. 41.) 2 This is an idea of Timseus, the Locrian : 'Oxoffot цev шv (TWV Kipao-eшр) еигтарri rav фvtп.v, a\yeivai CVTi' OKoffai Se алгокавurтаvri...
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Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding: Books II and IV (with ..., Book 2

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 382 pages
...farther asked, what it is moves desire? I answer, Happiness, and that alone. " Happiness " and " misery " are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not : it is what " eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to...
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Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding: Books II and IV (with Omissions)

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1905 - 424 pages
...asked, what it is moves desire? I answer, Happiness, and V that alone. " Happiness " and " misery " are the ' names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not: it is what " eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive."...
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The Classical Moralists: Selections Illustrating Ethics from Socrates to ...

Benjamin Rand - Ethics - 1909 - 832 pages
...farther asked, what it is moves desire? I answer, Happiness, and that alone. "Happiness" and "misery" are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not: it is what "eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive."...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

John Locke - Knowledge, Theory of - 1924 - 438 pages
...be farther asked, what it is moves desire, I answer, Happiness, and that alone. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not. But of some degrees of both we have very lively impressions, which, for shortness' sake, I shall comprehend under the names...
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British Moralists, 1650-1800: Hobbes

David Daiches Raphael - Philosophy - 1991 - 440 pages
...be farther asked, what it is moves desire? I answer happiness and that alone. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; it is what eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive....
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Leibniz: New Essays on Human Understanding

Gottfried Wilhelm Freiherr von Leibniz - Mathematics - 1996 - 528 pages
...it be farther asked, what 'tis moves desire? I answer happiness and that alone. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; 'tis what eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive.'...
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