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" Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; it is what 'eye hath not seen, ear not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive'. "
Notes on Aristophanes and Plato - Page 127
by Thomas Gray - 1884 - 4 pages
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Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs ..., Volume 1

Laconics - 1829 - 390 pages
...of the sea continue several hours after the winds are laid. — Addison. MDVII. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; but of some degrees of both, we have many lively impressions, by delight on the one side, and sorrow on the other, and therefore...
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The Malta penny magazine

536 pages
...raised by Phidias; both are temples of art, inimitable in their kinds. CONTENTMENT. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not ; but of some degrees of both, we have many lively impressions, by delight on the one side and sorrow on the other, and therefore...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volumes 18-19

1841 - 536 pages
...pipes interwoven on all sides with invisible glands or strainers. — ADDISON. HAPPINESS and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not; but of some degrees of both, we have many lively impressions, by delight on the one side and sorrow on the other, and therefore...
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Philosophical Beauties Selected from the Works of Jean Locke...containing ...

John Locke - 1844 - 272 pages
...IF it be asked, what it is moves desire ? I answer, happiness, and that alone. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not ; it is what " eye hath not seen, ear not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive."...
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Text-book of English Grammar: A Treatise on the Etymology and Syntax of the ...

John Hunter - English language - 1848 - 224 pages
...of imagination, sees not how languid the latter expression is ? Dr. Campbell. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not. Loche. What you have done hath not offended me. Shahspeare. It is the law, not I, condemns your brother....
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An essay concerning human understanding. With the notes and illustr. of the ...

John Locke - 1849 - 588 pages
...farther asked, what it is moves .desire 1 I answer, Happiness, and that alone. " Happiness" and " misery" are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not : it is what " eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to...
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The works of Plato: a new and literal version, by H. Cary (H. Davis, G. Burges).

Plato - 1854 - 548 pages
...Recollection, an act of the mind alone, restores to us ideas imprinted in the memory, after an intermission. 1 Happiness and misery, says Mr. Locke, are the names...them we have very lively ideas. (Chapt. of Power, i. 41.) * This is an idea of Timaeus, the Loerian, p. 100, C. 7. And Mr. Locke makes much the same...
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Locke's essays. An essay concerning human understanding. And A treatise on ...

John Locke - 1854 - 536 pages
...be farther asked what it is moves desire ? I answer, happiness, and that alone. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not ; it is what " eye hath not seen, ear not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive."...
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Laconics, Or The Best Words of the Best Authors

Aphorisms and apothegms - 1856 - 374 pages
...of the sea continue several hours after the winds are laid. — Addison. MDVIL Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not ; but of some degrees of bothv we have many lively impressions, by delight on the one side, and sorrow on the other, and therefore...
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English grammar. [With] Exercises on English grammar

William Jordan Unwin - 1862 - 126 pages
...successive intervals, by corresponding zones of vegetation. I saw the king crowned. Happiness and misery are the names of two extremes, the utmost bounds whereof we know not. THIRD PART. SYNTAX. 85. Write sentences respecting the following things : The lion, the butterfly,...
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