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" That rents the thorns, and is rent with the thorns ; Seeking a way, and straying from the way ; Not knowing how to find the open air, But toiling desperately to find it out, — Torment myself to catch the English crown. And from that torment I will free... "
King Henry VI, part 3 ; King Richard III ; King Henry VIII ; Troilus and ... - Page 62
by William Shakespeare, Alexander Chalmers - 1811
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1843
...catch the English crown: And from that torment I will free myself, Or hew my way out with a hloody axe. Why, I can smile, and murder while I smile; And...artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions. I 'lI drown more sailors than the mermaid shall; I 'll slay more gazers than the hasili-k ; I 'll play...
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Csar Borgia, by the author of 'Whitefriars'.

Emma Robinson - 1846
...and of his dear brother, the Orsino, in particular. 160 C.ESAR BORGIA. CHAPTER XII. A FEUDAL PEACE. " Why, I can smile, and murder while I smile, And cry,...artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions." — SHAKESPERE. AFTER this ceremonial it seemed as if, for the first time, that Caesar noticed specifically...
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Shakspeare and His Friends: Or, The Golden Age of Merry England

Robert Folkestone Williams - 1847 - 315 pages
...other Met with his vessel 1 Ant. Not as I remember. Asp. It should have been so. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHEB. I'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall ; I'll...I'll play the orator as well as Nestor ; Deceive more slyly than Ulysses could: And send the wondrous Machiavel to school. SHAKSPEABE. AFTER staying of several...
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Shakspeare and His Friends: Or, The Golden Age of Merry England

Robert Folkestone Williams - 1847 - 315 pages
...with hia vessel 1 Ant. Not as I remember. Asp. It should have been so. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER. t'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall ; I'll slay...I'll play the orator as well as Nestor ; Deceive more slyly than Ulysses could : And send the wondrous Macliiavel to school. SHAKSPEARE. AFTER staying of...
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Henry IV, pt. 2. Henry V. Henry VI, pts. 1-3

William Shakespeare - 1848
...And, whiles I live, to account this world but hell, * Until my head, that this misshaped trunk bears,1 *Be round impaled with a glorious crown. * And yet...play the orator as well as Nestor, * Deceive more slyly than Ulysses could, * And, like a Sinon, take another Troy. I can add colors to the chameleon...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare...: Embracing a Life of ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1850
...whiles I live, to account this world but hell, * Until my head, that this misshaped trunk bears,1 * Be round impaled with a glorious crown. * And yet...shall ; * I'll slay more gazers than the basilisk ; SC. II.] THIRD PART OF * I'll play the orator as well as Nestor, * Deceive more slyly than Ulysses...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1850
...And, whiles I live, to account this world but hell, * Until my head, that this misshaped trunk bears,1 *Be round impaled with a glorious crown. * And yet...artificial tears, * And frame my face to all occasions. *I'Il drown more sailors than the mermaid shall; *1'll slay more gazers than the basilisk; 1 The folio...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

1850
...open air, *But toiling desperately to find it out— * Seeking a way, and straying from the way, * Torment myself to catch the English crown ; * And...artificial tears, * And frame my face to all occasions. * I'll*drown more sailors than the merrnaid shall; * I'll slay more gazers than the basilisk ; * Pll...
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Apophthegms from the plays of Shakespeare, by C. Lyndon

William Shakespeare - 1850
...soft, mild, pitiful, and flexible; thou, stern, obdurate, flinty, rough, remorseless.—YORK, I., 4. Why, I can smile, and murder while I smile: and cry,...cheeks with artificial tears, and frame my face to all occasions.—Gio. III., 2. When the fox hath once got in his nose, he'll soon find means to make the...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...And, whiles I live, to account this world but hell, Until my head, that this misshaped trunk bears, Be round impaled with a glorious crown. And yet I...I'll play the orator as well as Nestor, Deceive more slyly than Ulysses could, I can add colors to the chameleon ; Change shapes with Proteus, for advantages....
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