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" Why should that name be sounded more than yours ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with 'em, ' Brutus ' will start a spirit as soon as  "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Timon of Athens. Coriolanus ... - Page 282
by William Shakespeare - 1826
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Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century

Stuart G. Shanker - Philosophy - 2003 - 461 pages
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Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century

Stuart G. Shanker - Philosophy - 2003 - 461 pages
...Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves....of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. (Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 4) Rare is the philosopher...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...likeness, and then of a difference, between himself and Caesar. 'Brutus and Caesar,' argues Cassius, / 'What should be in that "Caesar"? / Why should that...together, yours is as fair a name; / Sound them, it does become the mouth as well' (142-5). In the same way, although without the same calculation, the...
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Shakespeare: Invention of the Human: The Invention of the Human

Harold Bloom - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 768 pages
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The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, have not the time to meet you, We will therefore...'When Earth's Last Picture is Painted' And only the M our stars. But in ourselves, that we are underlings. 1 0276 Julius Caesar Let me have men about me...
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
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Shakespearean Criticism: Excerpts from the Criticism of William ..., Volume 50

1984
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Tragic Instance: The Sequence of Shakespeare's Tragedies

Ralph Berry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 228 pages
...encodes the data of ancestry and behavior which a Roman should embody. H Let Cassius focus the argument: Brutus and Caesar. What should be in that "Caesar"?...fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em. "Brutus" will start a spirit as soon as "Caesar."...
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Gulliveriana, Volume 7

Jeanne K. Welcher, George E. Bush - English fiction - 1970
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Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Allusions

Elizabeth Webber, Mike Feinsilber - Reference - 1999 - 592 pages
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