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" Why should that name be sounded more than yours ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well ; Weigh them, it is as heavy ; conjure with 'em, ' Brutus ' will start a spirit as soon as  "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Timon of Athens. Coriolanus ... - Page 282
by William Shakespeare - 1826
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Julius Caesar. Antony and Cleopatra. Cymbeline. Titus Andronicus. Pericles

William Shakespeare - 1848
...find ourselves dishonorable graves. 1 The verb arrive is also used by Milton without the preposition. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault,...Brutus, and Caesar ! what should be in that Caesar ? Write them together, yours is as fair a name ; Why should that name be sounded more than yours ?...
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The music, or melody of rhythmus of language: (1818).

James Chapman - Elocution - 1972 - 250 pages
...stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Brutus! andCa>sar! What should be in thatCaesar? — Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write...name. Sound them. — It doth become the mouth as well. Weigh them. — It is as heavy. Conjure with them. — Brutus ! will start a spirit as soon as...
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Il guardiano della storiografia: profilo di Federico Chabod e altri saggi

Gennaro Sasso - Historians - 1985 - 364 pages
...l'avaro silenzio che, 10Julius Caesar, 1,2, 138-45: «The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Brutus and...fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with'em, 'Brutus' will start a spirit as soon as 'Caesar'»....
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - Acting - 1990 - 207 pages
...man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves....fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, "Brutus" will start a spirit as soon as "Caesar."...
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The Ordering Mirror: Readers and Contexts

Literary Criticism - 1993 - 304 pages
...and, therefore, they recall Ulysses, the political counterpart of the "bawd" in Troilus and Cressida: Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that "Caesar"?...fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, "Brutus" will start a spirit as soon as "Caesar."...
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Die Semantik der musiko-literarischen Gattungen: Methodik und Analyse : eine ...

Ulrich Weisstein - Music and literature - 1994 - 276 pages
...man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a Colossus; and we petty men walk under his huge legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonourable graves....of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings. Our theatre-goer immediately understands these...
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The History of American Art Education: Learning about Art in American Schools

Peter Smith - Art - 1996 - 252 pages
...and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Brutus and...fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with'em, 'Brutus' will start a spirit as soon as 'Caesar.'"...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, ke a leg, and Cxsar: what should be in that Cassar? Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together,...
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Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century

Stuart G. Shanker - Philosophy - 2003 - 461 pages
...Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves....of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. (Julius Caesar Act 1, Scene 4) Rare is the philosopher...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...likeness, and then of a difference, between himself and Caesar. 'Brutus and Caesar,' argues Cassius, / 'What should be in that "Caesar"? / Why should that...together, yours is as fair a name; / Sound them, it does become the mouth as well' (142-5). In the same way, although without the same calculation, the...
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