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Books Books 81 - 90 of 155 on No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail; for....
" No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned. "
The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Together with A Journal of a Tour to the ... - Page 212
by James Boswell - 1888
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From Sail to Steam: Recollections of Naval Life

Alfred Thayer Mahan - 1907 - 325 pages
...Then he quoted Dr. Johnson: "No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail with the chance of being drowned"; and further to overwhelm me, he clinched the saying by a comment of his own. " In a ship of war you run...
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The life of Samuel Johnson. [Followed by] The journal of a tour to ..., Volume 1

James Boswell - 1852
...supposed, with his own consent, it appears, from a letter to John Wilkes, Esq., from Dr. Smollett, that his master kindly interested himself in procuring...being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned." 3 And at another time, " A man in a jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company."...
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Selections from the Works of Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson - 1909 - 479 pages
...firsthand, paints them vividly in Roderick Random. Johnson always had a horror of the life at sea. ' No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough...being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned.' ' A man in a jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company' (Life 1. 348). See passage...
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The Life of Samuel Johnson ...: Together with a Journal of a Tour ..., Volume 1

James Boswell - Authors, English - 1910
...have an home. I wish I could give it you. I am, my dear Sir, " Affectionately yourX " SAM. JOHNSON." l He now refreshed himself by an excursion to Oxford,...jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company." 0 The letter was as follows: " Chelsea, March 16, 1759. " DEAR SIR,—I am again your petitioner,...
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A Book of English Essays (1600-1900)

Stanley V. Makower, Basil H. Blackwell - English essays - 1913 - 573 pages
...traveller in a malarious country. It is easy enough to understand the opinion of Dr. Johnson : ' Why, sir,' he said, ' no man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail.' You would fancy any one's spirit would die out under such an accumulation of darkness, noisomeness,...
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The Mechanism of English Style

Lewis Worthington Smith - American prose literature - 1916 - 291 pages
...traveler in a malarious country. It is easy enough to understand the opinion of Dr. Johnson: " Why, sir," he said, " no man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail." You would fancy anyone's spirit would die out under such 30 an accumulation of darkness, noisomeness,...
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Boswell's Life of Johnson

James Boswell - 1917 - 574 pages
...thrice, which I had disused for many years. I have proposed to Vansittart, climbing over the wall, but he has refused me. And I have clapped my hands till...jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company.' The letter was as follows: — 'Chelsea, March 16, 1759. 'DEAR SIR, I am again your petitioner,...
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Sonia, Between Two Worlds

Stephen McKenna - 1917 - 465 pages
...acceptable companions with money and leisure to spare, answered my invitation in Dr. Johnson's words: "No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough...himself into a jail: for being in a ship is being in jail with a chance of being drowned. ... A, man in a jail has more room, better food, and commonly...
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Seamen's Missions: Their Origin and Early Growth

Roald Kverndal - History - 1986 - 903 pages
...Ministry to Seafarers "No man will be a sailor," insisted Dr. Samuel Johnson, "who has contrivance to get himself into a jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned."1 Harsh though they might seem, those words, uttered in 1759, were nevertheless an understatement....
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Words that Taste Good

Bill Moore - Poetry - 1987 - 175 pages
...ship, To sail and sail and sail! WALT WHITMAN Dr. Samuel Johnson, of dictionary fame, hated ships. He said: No man will be a sailor who has contrivance...jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with a chance of being drowned ... A man in jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company!...
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