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" Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath : husband, I come : Now to that name my courage prove my title ! I am fire and air ; my other elements I give to baser life. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ... - Page 277
by William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
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Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1858
...here requires no farther explanation. To praise my noble act ; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath....Farewell, kind Charmian : — Iras, long farewell. [Kisses them. IRAS falls and dies. Have I the aspick in my lips ? Dost fall ? If thou and nature can...
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The Plays of Shakespeare with the Poems, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...Egypt's grape shall moist this lip : — Ynre, yure. good Iras ; quick. — Mcthinks I hear Antony call ; glean'd ; \Kii»et them. Is.\& falls and dies.* Have I the aspic in my lips ? Dost fall ? If thou and nature...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...; quick. — Methinks I hear Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hoar s. CASCA. [Kisses them. IRAS falls and dies." Have I the aspic in my lips? Dust fall? If thou and nature can...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860 - 40 pages
...Antony call ; I sec him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hoar him mock The luck of Csesnr, . ǜ. Chairman ; — Iras, long farewell. [Kisses them. IIIAS fa/ls and dies.* Have I the aspic in my lips...
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The plays (poems) of Shakespeare, ed. by H. Staunton ..., Part 170, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1860
...Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble net ; I hear him mock The luck of Ciesar, n honourable keeping her. \Vhat treason were it to...strain as this, Should once set footing in your genero Charmiau ; — Iras, long farewell. [Л'/.че« them, IHAS fallí and dies.' Have I the aspic in my...
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Choice thoughts from Shakspere, by the author of 'The book of familiar ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...noble act : I hear him mock The luck of Ceesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after-wrath : Husband, I come : Now to that name my courage prove...the last warmth of my lips, Farewell, kind Charmian ; — Iris, long farewell. Ctesar's Comments on the Death of Cleopatra. Her physician tells me, She...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, from the Text of Johnson ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1862
...Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble ant ; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath...Farewell, kind Charmian ; — Iras, long farewell. [Kisses them. IEAS falls and difs.l Have I the aspic in my lips ? Dost fall ? If thou and nature can...
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The Works of Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1864
...Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hear him mock The luck of Cœsar, hich is the thief? — Thou hast [Аше« them. IBAS/O/ÍS and dt«&* Have I the aspic in my lips ? Dost fall ? If thou and nature...
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Trageies

William Shakespeare - English drama - 1864
...Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath....elements I give to baser life. — So, — have you done 1 Come then, and take the last warmth of my lips. Farewell, kind Charmian ; — Iras, long farewell....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, with Biographical Introduction by ...

William Shakespeare - 1865
...him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath. Husband, I como : ' Now to that name my courage prove my title ! I am...Farewell, kind Charmian ; — Iras, long farewell. [Kisses them. IRAS falls and dies. Have I the aspic in my lips? Dost fall? If thou and nature can so...
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