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" The bell strikes one. We take no note of time, But from its loss. To give it then a tongue Is wise in man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the, knell of my departed hours : Where are they? "
The poetic reciter; or, Beauties of the British poets: adapted for reading ... - Page 238
by Henry Marlen - 1838
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Chambers's Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History ..., Volumes 3-4

Robert Chambers - American literature - 1830 - 844 pages
...indulge, Resembles ocean into tempest wrought, To waft a feather, or to drown a fly. Thought» on Time. } /, K 8 P $wZ b _ @ Շ{ z 7 l?n i ?B Ր&/ @ 9L 4(Ń R . A; Ƭ I & Q k \K&d it1 an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound: If heard aright, It is the knell of my departed hours....
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Select British Poets: Containing the Works of Goldsmith, Thomson, Gray ...

Thomas F. Walker - English poetry - 1830 - 256 pages
...her long arrear : Nor let the phial of thy vengeance, ponrM On this devoted head, be pour'd in vain. The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But from its loss. To give it then a tongue, '• wise in man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the knell of...
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Studies in Poetry and Prose: Consisting of Selections Principally from ...

A. B. Cleveland - American literature - 1832 - 496 pages
...his duty towards you, and observe more exactly the consideration due to you. REFLECTIONS AT MIDNIGHT. THE bell strikes One. We take no note of time But...years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands dispatch: How much is to be done! My hopes and fears Start up alarmed, and o'er life's narrow verge...
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The Poetic Reader: Containing Selections from the Most Approved Authors ...

Joseph Emerson - Elocution - 1832 - 122 pages
...lectuie silent, but ofsov'reign pow'r ! To vice, confusion ; and to virtue, peace. NO. 164. TIME"! THE bell strikes one. We take no note of time. But...heard aright, It is the knell of my departed hours. 5 Where are they ? With the years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands dispatch, How much...
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The New Road to Ruin: A Novel, Volume 1

Lady Catherine Pollock Manners Stepney - 1833 - 324 pages
...as we estimate the fleeting hours, it is circumstantial notice that informs us on character : — ' We take no note of time But from its loss : to give...man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, How complicate, how wonderful, is man ! How passing wonder...
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The Complaint, Or, Night Thoughts

Edward Young - 1833 - 360 pages
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The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 1

Edward Young - Fore-edge painting - 1834 - 370 pages
...her long arrear: Nor let the phial of thy vengeance, pour'd On this devoted head, be pour'd in vain. -.The bell strikes one. We take no note of time But...years beyond the flood. It is the signal that demands dispatch : How much is to be done ? My hopes and fears StarJ up alarm'd, and o'er life's narrow verge...
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The Poetical Works of the Rev. George Crabbe: With His Letters and ..., Volume 2

George Crabbe - 1834 - 362 pages
...my Sexton seek, Whose days are sped ? — " What! he, himself! — and is old Dibble dead?" (1) C " As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the knell of my departed houn. — YOUNG.] His eightieth year he reach'd, still undecay'd, And rectors five to one close vault...
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The Book of Familiar Quotations: Being a Collection of Popular Extracts and ...

Quotations, English - 1871 - 340 pages
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The Engineer's and Mechanic's Encyclopędia: Comprehending ..., Volume 1

Luke Hebert - Industrial arts - 1835 - 816 pages
...lens, set fire to the • powder, which discharges the gun, and thus announces the hour of noon. " We take no note of time but from its loss: To give it then a tongue is wise in man." Dials of this description are placed in the gardens of the Palais Royal, and of the Luxembourg. DIALLING....
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