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" more happie is the state In which ye, father, here doe dwell at ease, Leading a life so free and fortunate From all the tempests of these worldly seas, Which tosse the rest in daungerous disease; Where warres, and wreckes, and wicked enmitie Doe them... "
The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser - Page 371
by Edmund Spenser - 1921 - 736 pages
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Sidney's Poetic Justice: The Old Arcadia, Its Eclogues, and Renaissance ...

Robert E. Stillman - Country life in literature - 1986 - 292 pages
...accepted the hospitality of old Meliboe than he begins to expostulate on his host's happy condition: ... so free and fortunate From all the tempests of these worldly seas, Which tosse the rest in daungerous disease.15 The fact that the knight, not the shepherd, makes this speech, Spenser humorously reminds...
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Dryden's Aeneid: The English Virgil

Taylor Corse - Aeneas (Legendary character) in literature - 1991 - 164 pages
...Calidore addresses Meliboee: How much (sayd he) more happie is the state, In which ye father here do dwell at ease, Leading a life so free and fortunate, From all the tempests of these worldly seas. (FQ 6.9.19) 25. Dryden imitates this passage of Milton in Mac Flecknoe (106-7) and in his verse epistle,...
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Shakespeare, Spenser and the Contours of Britain: Reshaping the Atlantic ...

Joan Fitzpatrick - History - 2004 - 198 pages
...lead, without debate or bitter strife" (6.9.18.8-9). Calidore admires the freedom of pastoral life - "How much (sayd he) more happie is the state, / In...dwell at ease, / Leading a life so free and fortunate" (6.9.19.1-3) - but Meliboe's response is qualified: If happie, then it is in this intent, That hauing...
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The Myth of Sisyphus: Renaissance Theories of Human Perfectibility

Elliott M. Simon - Perfection - 2007 - 622 pages
...he has achieved the personal benefits of his imperfect virtue by adopting the life of the shepherds. How much (sayd he) more happie is the state, In which...disease; Where warres, and wreckes, and wicked enmitie Do them afflict, which no man can appease, That certes I your happinesse enuie, And wish my lot were...
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