Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears : I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones ; So let it be with Caesar. "
The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ... - Page 288
by William Shakespeare - 1805
Full view - About this book

Shakespearean Criticism: Excerpts from the Criticism of William ..., Volume 63

1984
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2001 - 128 pages
...brutus(= dull, without reason). Antony You gentle Romans — All Peace ho, let us hear him. Antony Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! I...not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them, 75 The good is oft interred with their bones: So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath...
Limited preview - About this book

The Best of English Literature

Jean Briat, Annie Lhérété - 2001 - 444 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

TAKS Coach Reading Grade 9

Stuart Margulies - Achievement tests - 2002 - 204 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

Florida Fcat Mathematics Coach, Grade 10

Jerome D. Kaplan - Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test - 2001 - 224 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

Presentation Skills: The Essential Guide for Students

Patsy McCarthy, Patsy McCarthy Caroline Hatcher, Dr Caroline Hatcher - 2002 - 228 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

Bible Explorer's Guide: How to Understand and Interpret the Bible

John Phillips - Religion - 286 pages
...to speak at Caesar's funeral, makes one of the greatest speeches in English literature. He begins: "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I...interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar." To "spiritualize" that passage, as some expositors do with passages in the Bible, might produce something...
Limited preview - About this book

The Wild Ones

Matt Braun - Fiction - 2002 - 277 pages
...was Stroud alone, a man with the power of life and death. His eloquent baritone lifted with emotion. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I...interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar . . Fontaine labored on to the end of the soliloquy. When he finished, the crowd swapped baffled glances,...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare for One: Men : the Complete Monologues and Audition Pieces

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2002 - 298 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Shakespeare Survey, Volume 40

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 256 pages
...that it is not true. (p. 157) Almost the same divergence occurs in the beginning of his speech: I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men...interred with their bones. So let it be with Caesar. (lines 76-9) Though his statement of intention seems straightforward to his hearers in the Forum at...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF