Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
King Henry VIII. Coriolanus - Page 89
by William Shakespeare - 1788
Full view - About this book

An Inquiry Into the Philosophy and Religion of Shakspere

William John Birch - Religion in literature - 1848 - 547 pages
...religion in it. But how, except in irony, could a man, such as Wolsey, declare to Cromwell that he was — Well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and I feel within mo A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. Could he know himself ? Was this...
Full view - About this book

Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and ..., Volumes 7-8

Anna Maria Hall - 1848
...did we ever feel the emotion of respect and interest that swells our heart as we hear him say : — " I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, Л still and quiet conscience. * * I am able now, methlnks, (Out of a fortitude of soul I feel,) To...
Full view - About this book

Poetry for schools

Frederick Charles Cook - 1849
...wonder A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fall'n indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me. I humbly thank his grace, and from these shoulders — These ruin'd pillars, — out of pity,...
Full view - About this book

Exercises in Rhetorical Reading: With a Series of Introductory Lessons ...

Richard Green Parker - Elocution - 1849 - 432 pages
...should decline ? Nay, if you weep, I 'm fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well; 15 Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities ; A still and quiet conscience. The king has eased me. I humbly thank his grace : and, from these shoulders, 20 These ruined pillars, out of pity...
Full view - About this book

The British orator

Thomas King Greenbank - 1849
...wonder A great man should decline ? Nay, if you weep, I'm fallen indeed. Crom. How does your Grace ? I know myself now, and I feel within me A peace above...dignities; A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace; and, from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity taken...
Full view - About this book

THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE; ILLUSTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1850
...wonder, A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell....dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book

The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1850
...wonder, A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book

Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 418 pages
...Show not their mealy wings but to the summer. TC iii. 3. Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. 1 know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above...ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navv, top much honour: O, 'tis a burden, Cromwell, 'tis a burden, FALLEN GREATNESS, — continued....
Full view - About this book

Half hours of English history, selected and illustr. by C. Knight, Volume 1

English history - 1851
...wonder A great man should decline Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crotn. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well, Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell....dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cur d me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...wonder, A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace? Wol. " Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell....dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF