Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. "
King Henry VIII. Coriolanus - Page 89
by William Shakespeare - 1788
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1836
...mun should decline? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crmn. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, wen ; Лаг. What if I do not ? оя, indeed, I do not ; Yet, for I know thou art religious, And stilt and quiet conscience. The king has curM me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders,...
Full view - About this book

Historical Memoirs of His Own Time, Volume 2

Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall - Great Britain - 1836
...were Passages in this Speech, which reminded me of Wolsey's Language to Cromwell, when he says, -" I feel within me A Peace above all earthly Dignities ; A still and quiet Conscience." -" I am able now, methinks, (Out of a Fortitude of Soul I feel,) To endure more Miseries, and greater...
Full view - About this book

Maxims on Health, Business, Law, Policy, and Mind

Maxims - 1836 - 130 pages
...preserve dignity. 143. 151. Every braggart is a coward. 152. Tig the mind that makes the body rich. 153. I feel 'within me a peace above all earthly dignities, a still and quiet conscience. 154. Thou hast no speculation in those eyes which thou dost glare with. 155. Ay, but to die, and go...
Full view - About this book

The Elocutionist: Consisting of Declamations and Readings in Prose and ...

Jonathan Barber - Oratory - 1836 - 392 pages
...wonder 32 A great man should decline ? Nay, if you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your Grace ? Wol Why, well— Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now, and feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities; A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured...
Full view - About this book

The wisdom and genius of Shakspeare: comprising moral philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1838
...must for ever hide me. Vain pomp, and glory of this world, I hate ye : I feel my heart new open'd. I know myself now; and I feel within me A peace above...all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. 25 — iii. 2. 20 Much attribute he hath ; and much the reason Why we ascribe it to him : yet all his...
Full view - About this book

The Greenwich Pensioners

Hatchway (lieut, R.N., pseud.) - 1838
...do you find yourself?" He answered me with another quotation, as follows : — "Never so truly happy I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above...earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience." " Thank you for your information," I said ; " and how long may you have indulged yourself in this way...
Full view - About this book

The complete works of William Shakspeare, with notes by the most ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1838
...Crom* liow does your grace ? Wol, Why, weU Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know ).л self now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly...dignities, A .still and quiet conscience. The king has corM n* 1 humbly tlmnk his grace; and from these shoulder These ruin'd pillars, ont of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book

Rolling Ridge: Or, The Book of Four and Twenty Chapters ...

Samuel Hayes Elliot - Country life - 1838 - 266 pages
...the nucleus of wretchedness and vice; the home of death! CHAPTER XI. A VISIT TO BLIND REBECCA. * * * "I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience." Henry Hie Eighth. "How often is the poor man's cottage the palace of God." Dairyman's Daughter. We...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1839
...wonder, A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself...humbly thank .his grace ; and from these shoulders, Wol. Why, well; These ruin'd pillars, out of pity, taken A load would sink a navy, too much honour:...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Henry IV, pt. 2. Henry V. Henry VI ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...wonder, A great man should decline ? Nay, an you weep, I am fallen indeed. Crom. How does your grace ? Wol. Why, well ; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell....dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has cured me, I humbly thank his grace ; and from these shoulders, These ruined pillars, out of pity, taken...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF