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" Sovereigns, in forming this august union, have regarded as its fundamental basis, their invariable resolution never to depart, either among themselves or in their relations with other States, from the strictest observation of the principles of the right... "
The Parliamentary Debates from the Year 1803 to the Present Time - Page 175
by Great Britain. Parliament - 1819
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Introduction to the Study of International Law

Theodore Dwight Woolsey - 1872 - 487 pages
...among• themselves or in their relations with other states, from the strictest observance of the law of nations, — principles, which, in their application to a state of permanent peace, are alone able to give an effectual guaranty to the independence of each government, and to the stability...
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Lectures on International Law: Delivered in the Middle Temple Hall to the ...

Sheldon Amos - International law - 1874 - 136 pages
...among themselves or in their relations with other States, " ' from thej strictest observance of the Law of Nations,— "' principles which, in their application to a state of "' permanent peace, are alone able to give at. effectual " ' guaranty to the independence of each Government, and " ' to...
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The Map of Europe by Treaty: Showing the Various Political and ..., Volume 1

Sir Edward Hertslet - Europe - 1875
...basis their invariable resolution never uĞ depart, either among themselves, or in their Relations with other States, from the strictest observation of the principles of the Kight of Nations ; principled, which, in their application to a state of permanent Peace, can alone...
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The Science of International Law

Thomas Alfred Walker - Electronic books - 1893 - 544 pages
...to " their invariable resolution never to " depart, either among themselves, or in their relations " with other states, from the strictest observation of the " principles of the Rights of Nations ; principles, which, " in their application to a state of permanent peace, can "...
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1815-1850

Charles McLean Andrews - Europe - 1896
...They bound themselves "to observe the principles of the law of nations, which alone could efficiently guarantee the independence of each government and the stability of the general association." They solemnly acknowledged " that their duty toward God and toward the people that they governed required...
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International Law

George Grafton Wilson, George Fox Tucker - International law - 1901 - 493 pages
...it was " their invariable resolution never to depart, either among themselves, or in their relations with other states, from the strictest observation of the principles of the Rights of Nations."1 That the practice of the Great Powers has not been strictly in accord with these...
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Report of the Annual Lake Mohonk Conference on International ..., Volumes 13-17

Arbitration (International law) - 1907
...their relations with other states, from the strictest observance of the principles of international law which in their application to a state of permanent peace can alone effectively guarantee the independence of each government and the stability of the general association."...
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Universal Peace

Victor Hugo Duras - Arbitration (International law) - 1908 - 186 pages
...avowed in their unwarrantable resolution never to depart, either among themselves or in their relations with other states, from the strictest observation of the principles of the "Rights of Nations." The attempt to extend the principle of intervention in favor of maintaining the...
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Handbook of International Law

George Grafton Wilson - Foreign relations - 1910 - 623 pages
...it was "their invariable resolution never to depart, either among themselves or in their relations with other states, from the strictest observation of the principles of the rights of nations." ° In 1856, however, the five great powers of that day admitted the Turkish Empire...
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Outlines of International Law

Charles H. Stockton - International law - 1914 - 616 pages
...was their intention never to depart from the "strictest observation of the principles of the rights of nations; principles which in their application...government and the stability of the general association." This declaration of the five cabinets was soon put to a test. A revolution broke out in Spain against...
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