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" I COME no more to make you laugh; things now, That bear a weighty and a serious brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Richard III. Henry VIII. Troilus ... - Page 135
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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Shakespeare: The Evidence: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Man and His Work

Ian Wilson - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 512 pages
...best entertainment for royal wedding celebrations? The mood Shakespeare set is quite apparent from the Prologue: I come no more to make you laugh; things...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. ending, after an exhortation to 'Think ye see/ The very persons of our noble story' with the doom-laden:...
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New Sites for Shakespeare: Theatre, the Audience, and Asia

John Russell Brown - Drama - 1999 - 211 pages
...individuals would have to be held with a looser rein, as the Prologue to Henry the Eighth mockingly explains: Those that can pity here May, if they think it well,...Such as give Their money out of hope they may believe Mav here find truth too. Those that come to see Onlv a show or two, and so agree The play may pass,...
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The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor

Bruce R. Smith, Dean's Professor of English Bruce R Smith - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 386 pages
...to make you laugh." The emphasis instead falls on "woe," "noble," and "flow": Things now, That beare a Weighty, and a Serious Brow, Sad, high, and working,...Noble Scenes, as draw the Eye to flow We now present. The audience to Henry VIII are flattered as "gentle Hearers," indeed "The First and Happiest Hearers...
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Pragmatism and Other Writings

William James - Psychology - 2000 - 358 pages
...which I propose to give tonight cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, — / come no more to make you laugh; things now, That bear...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, — 2 must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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Say It Like Shakespeare: How to Give a Speech Like Hamlet, Persuade Like ...

Thomas Leech - Business & Economics - 2001 - 313 pages
...flew right back onto the wagon. The preacher saw this and said, "Well I'll be damned!" Make 'em Weep I come no more to make you laugh: things now, That...here May, if they think it well, let fall a tear. Prologue, Henry VIII. Would you expect hilarity in a story of a man who phases out eight wives, several...
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The Life of King Henry the Eighth

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 126 pages
...UPON QUEEN KATHERINE SCENE: London; Kimbolton] * The Life of King Henry the Eighth THE PROLOGUE Pro. I come no more to make you laugh. Things now That...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, 3 Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow We now present. Those that can pity, here May (if they...
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James and Dewey on Belief and Experience

William James, John Dewey - Philosophy - 2005 - 290 pages
...answer which I propose to give tonight cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, I come no more to make you laugh; things now, That...brow, . Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe,2 must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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Laughing and Weeping in Early Modern Theatres

Matthew Steggle - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 158 pages
...audience weep. Shakespeare and Fletcher's Henry VIII offers, guardedly, the possibility that it might: I come no more to make you laugh. Things now That...well, let fall a tear; The subject will deserve it ...40 The Epilogue to Robert Gomersall's The Tragedie ofLodouick Sforza, Duke ofMillan makes the audacious...
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Henry VIII

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2011 - 352 pages
...happiest: most fortunate 25. sad: serious 27. As: ie, as if 29. thousand: ie, a thousand r Enter Prologue.^ PROLOGUE I come no more to make you laugh. Things...to flow, We now present. Those that can pity here 5 May, if they think it well, let fall a tear; The subject will deserve it. Such as give Their money...
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THE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

1685
...other Attendants. 5ENE, chiefly in London and Westminste ; once, at Kimbolton. KING HENKY VIII ACT I. PROLOGUE. I COME no more to make you laugh : things...May, if they think it well, let fall a tear ; The subjec^ will deserve it : such, as give Their money out of hope they may believe, May here find truth...
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