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" I COME no more to make you laugh; things now, That bear a weighty and a serious brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, Such noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Richard III. Henry VIII. Troilus ... - Page 135
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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The Will to Believe: And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy

William James - Belief and doubt - 1896 - 332 pages
...I propose to give to-night cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, — " I come no more to make you laugh ; things now, That...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, " — must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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Is Life Worth Living?

William James - Life - 1896 - 63 pages
...that I propose to give to-night cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, " I come no more to make you laugh ; things now, That...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe," must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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The Will to Believe: And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy

William James - Belief and doubt - 1896 - 332 pages
...I propose to give to-night cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, — " I come no more to make you laugh ; things now, That...brow, Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, " — must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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The Plays of Shakespeare, Volume 17

William Shakespeare - 1897
...(luards, and other attendants. SCENE — Ohiefly in LONDON and WESTMINSTEB ; once, at KIMBOLTON. PROLOGUE. Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe, Such...give Their money out of hope they may believe, May hero find Truth too. Those that come to see Only a show or two, and so agree The play may pass, if...
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The New England Society Orations: Addresses, Sermons, and Poems ..., Volume 2

Cephas Brainerd, Eveline Warner Brainerd - New England - 1901
...True and well-chosen are the words, with which Shakspeare begins his historical drama of Henry VIII. : "I come no more to make you laugh ; things now That...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present." In all history there is not one cycle better defined and more complete than that which sweeps from...
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The New England Society Orations: Addresses ..., Volume 2; Volume 69; Volume 777

Cephas Brainerd, Eveline Warner Brainerd - New England - 1901
...True and well-chosen are the words, with which Shakspeare begins his historical drama of Henry VIII. : "I come no more to make you laugh ; things now That...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present." In all history there is not one cycle better denned and more complete than that which sweeps from the...
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Histories and poems

William Shakespeare - 1901
...accuracy. The action covers a period of twelve years, — from 1521 to 1533. KING HENRY THE EIGHTH. THE PROLOGUE. I COME no more to make you laugh : things...state and woe, Such noble scenes as draw the eye to Sow, We now present. Those that can pity, here May, if they think it well, let fall a tear ; The subject...
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The Strange Case of Francis Tidir

Parker Woodward - 1901 - 117 pages
...Prologue not calculated to draw crowds to his Theatre, as the following extracts will show : — " I come no more to make you laugh ; things now That...full of state and woe, Such noble scenes as draw the eyes to flow, We now present. Those that can now pity here May, if they think it well, let fall a tear....
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Ethical Addresses and Ethical Record, Volume 12

Ethics - 1905
...The answer that I propose to give cannot be jocose. In the words of one of Shakespeare's prologues, "I come no more to make you laugh ; things now, That...brow. Sad, high, and working, full of state and woe," must be my theme. In the deepest heart of all of us there is a corner in which the ultimate mystery...
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Longman's Handbook of English Literature: From A.D. 673 to the ..., Part 5

Longmans, Green, and Co, Robert McWilliam - English literature - 1905 - 608 pages
...air of sadness and weariness of the world. I come no more to make you laugh ; things now That beare a weighty and a serious brow, Sad, high and working,...noble scenes as draw the eye to flow, We now present.' The accession of the new king, James I., brought new fame and dignity to Shakspere. Southampton was...
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