Page images
PDF
EPUB

ITS CONDITIONS AND PROBLEMS

A SELECTION OF ESSAYS FOR USE IN

COLLEGE WRITING COURSES

ARRANGED AND EDITED BY

MAURICE GARLAND FULTON

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH IN DAVIDSON COLLEGE

AUTHOR OF “EXPOSITORY WRITING”

New York
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

Set up and electrotyped. Published November, 1914.
Reprinted February, July, October, 1915. June, 1916
October, 1916.

[ocr errors]

PREFACE

In this volume, intended primarily for use in English composition classes, the selections have been chosen chiefly from the writings of college presidents and other educators with a view to covering some of the more important questions and problems of the student's personal relation to the various aspects of college life-intellectual, athletic, and social. Such material has for the English composition course a twofold value.

In the first place, material of this kind enables the student to receive at the beginning of his college career help in understanding the college and his relation to it. The student is generally seriously lacking in proper knowledge of the fundamental ideas involved in the college course he has entered upon -the ideas which are in fact necessary to insure success. He rarely has any conception of what the term liberal education means, or what combination of studies such an education demands; neither does he know the intellectual ideas that should dominate him as he pursues these studies; and he fails also in the utilizaticn to the utmost of the incidental advantages which college life offers in its play and its social aspects. The English composition course seems a logical place in which to give students that understanding of the educational and social interests of the college necessary to enable them to become good "college citizens."

A glance at the groupings in the table of contents shows the extent to which this volume attempts to cover the field of college life. About half of the material bears upon the college curriculum. The first group treats of the general function of the college in education; the second presents the two great branches of education, namely, science and art, and their contrasted claims; the third takes up the individual student's selection of

« PreviousContinue »