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tilages about the joints, there does not seem a suf-
ficient analogy to authorize their arrangement un-
der the same name.
The white swelling of the knee, when it suppu-
rates, comes under this species, with variety of
other ulcers, attended with carious bones.

19. Caries offium, or Necross assium. A caries of the bones may be termed a suppuration of them; it differs from the above, as it generally is occafioned by some external injury, as in decaying teeth; or by venereal virus, as in nodes on the tibia; or by other matter derived to the bone in malignant fevers; and is not confined to the ends of them.

The separation of the dead bone from the living is a work of sometime. See Sečt. XXXIII. 3, 1. A new and able work on the necross of bones is published by I. Russel, Edinburgh, London, Robinsons. And another by I. P. Weidmann, de Necrosi Ossium at Francsort; Boosey, London; which is also a valuable work.

M. M. When this disease is not formed in syphilis, or by metastasis in sever, but is simply an inflammation of the periosteum, or of the solid bone, or of its medullary cells, the method of cure should consist in evacuations by bleeding and cathartics, and by leeches applied to the painful or tumid parts; and afterwards by taking inwardly soda phosphorata and a decoction of rubia tinc- forum,

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From this analogy there is reason to suspect that the matter of all contagious diseases, whether with or without fever, is not infectious till it has acquired something from the air; which, by oxygenating the secreted matter, may probably produce a new acid. And, secondly, that in hectic fever a part of the purulent matter is absorbed; or ačts on the surface of the ulcer; as variolous matter affects the inoculated part of the arm. And that hectic fever is therefore caused by the matter of an open ulcer; and not by the sensation in the ulcer independent of the aerated pus, which lies on it. Which may account for the venereal matter from buboes not giving the infection, according to the experiments of the late Mr. Hunter, and for some other phenomena of contagion. See

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SPECIES.

1. Gomorrhoea venerea. A pus-like contagious material discharged from the urethra after impure cohabitation, with smarting or heat on making water; which begins at the external extremity of the urethra, to which the contagious matter is applied, and where it has access to the air; which

probably heightens its acrimony. M. M. In this state of the venereal disease, once venese&tion, with mild cathartics of senna and manna, with mucilage, as almond emulsion, and F f 4 gum gum arabic, taken for two or three weeks, absolve the cure. Is camphor of use to relieve the ardor urinae o Do balsams increase or lessen the heat of urine? Neutral salts certainly increase the smarting in making water, by increasing the acri. mony of the urine. Can the discharge from the urethra be soon stopped by saturnine injections, or mercurial ones, or with solution of blue vitriol, at first very dilute, and gradually made stronger ? And at the same time, left the syphilis, or general disease, should supervene, the patient might take a quarter of a grain of corrosive sublimate of mercury twice a day, as directed below : There is a curious paper by Mr. Addington, of West Bromage, in the Contributions of Medical Knowiedge, published by Dr. Beddoes, on the cure of gonorrhoea virulenta, by large doses of corrosive sublimate of mercury, hydrargyrus muriatus. Three grains of corrosive sublimate of mercury are dissolved in one ounce of reëtified spirit of wine. Half of this mixture is taken undiluted at going to bed; it produces a copious salivation for an hour and a half, or longer, during which the patient spits a quart. Some Glauber's salts are to be taken on the second day after this operation, and on the evening of that day he is to repeat the draught, and the salts on the day but one following. And Mr. Addington witnessed that three or four such doses frequently cured a venereal gonorrhoea

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