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Promotions to all grades below that of major general are made subject to the eligible officer passing the prescribed physical, mental, moral, and professional examinations.

The proposed bill as now drafted, if enacted, would involve no additional cost to the Government.

The Navy Department considers that this proposed Marine Corps personnel legislation is a matter of paramount importance to the officers of the Marine Corps individually and to the welfare and efficiency of the Marine Corps generally in view of the constantly increasing seriousness of the situation in regard to stagnation of promotion. It is believed that the solution of the problem lies in the adoption of a system similar to that embraced in the line officers' personnel legislation enacted March 3, 1931, Public No. 784, with such modification as is necessary to meet the different conditions obtaining in the Marine Corps. The accompany. ing draft is designed to accomplish the purpose desired so far as may be practicable without involving additional cost.

In view of the foregoing, the Navy Department recommends that this proposed legislation be enacted. Sincerely yours,

C. F. ADAMS, Secretary of the Navy.

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SUPPLIES FOR THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT

FEBRUARY 18, 1932.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. Haines, from the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 5612]

The Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, having had under consideration the bill (H. R. 5612) to limit the purchases of the Post Office Department, so far as possible, to articles of the growth, production, or manufacture of the United States, reports the same back to the House with the following amendment:

In line 11 strike out the period after the word “unreasonable,” insert a comma in lieu thereof, and add “subject to the approval of the Comptroller General.”

So amended, the committee recommends that the bill do pass.

The law now in effect states that the Postmaster General, in purchasing or contracting for supplies for the Post Office Department, shall give preference to articles of domestic production and manufacture, conditions of price and quality being equal. The bill would extend this provision to articles of domestic growth, production, or manufacture even though they cost more, if such excess of cost is not unreasonable. The committee's amendment requires the approval of the Comptroller General to such purchases or contracts.

A comparison of the present law and the proposed legislation is shown below, the committee's amendment to the bill being indicated by the words in italics at the end of the bill: (Excerpt from the act making appropriations for the

service of the Post Office Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1905, and for other purposes, approved April 28, 1904 (33 Stat. 440; U.S. C., title 5, sec. 366)]

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or

All purchases, advertisements, and That in the expenditure of approcontracts for supplies for the Post priations hereafter made, and expended Office Department shall be made by the under his direction, the Postmaster purchasing agent in the name of the General shall, unless in his discretion Postmaster General subject to his the interest of the Government will not approval, and in purchasing such sup- permit, purchase, contract for, plies preference shall be given to within the limits of the United States, articles of domestic production and only articles of the growth, production, manufacture, conditions of price and or manufacture of the United States, quality being equal.

notwithstanding that such articles of the growth, production, or manufacture of the United States may cost more, if such excess of cost be not unreasonable, subject to the approval of the Comptroller

General. Legislation similar to this bill was incorporated in the appropriation acts for the War and Navy Departments for the current fiscal year 1932 (46 Stat. 1287, 1450) reading as follows:

That in the expenditure of appropriations in this act the Secretary shall, unless in his discretion the interest of the Government will not permit, purchase or contract for, within the limits of the United States, only articles of the growth, production, or manufacture of the United States, notwithstanding that such articles of the growth, production, or manufacture of the United States may cost more, if such excess of cost be not unreasonable.

There were two bills pertaining to this subject considered by the committee, one, H. R. 4664, that applied to cotton cord, twine, and string, and the other, H. R. 5612, broader in scope, and which applied to all purchases made by the Post Office Department. H. R. 4664 was rejected while H. R. 5612 received the approval of the committee.

The report from the Post Office Department on the bills is as follows:

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL,

Washington, D. C., January 19, 1932. Hon. JAMES M. MEAD,

House of Representatives. MY DEAR CONGRESSMAN MEAD: The receipt is acknowledged of your letter of January 14, transmitting copies of H. R. 4664 and H. R. 5612, and requesting an expression of the department's views concerning these bills.

H. R. 4664 would confine the department's purchase to cotton twine regardless of cost. While we favor the use of domestic products, yet in the interest of economical administration it is not believed that any such arbitrary limitation should be imposed. The department is not in favor of the enactment of this bill.

H. R. 5612 is preferable to HI. R. 4664 in that it provides that domestic goods shall be preferred only if the excess of cost over foreign goods is not unreasonable. While it is believed that any legislation which Congress may enact on this subject should be applicable to all branches of the Government, the department has no objection to the provisions of H. R. 5612. By direction of the Postmaster General. Very truly yours,

Harold N. GRAVES, Executive Assistant to the Postmaster General.

O

MODIFICATION OF PANAMA CANAL ZONE AND THE

REPUBLIC OF PANAMA BOUNDARY LINE

FEBRUARY 18, 1932.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. West, from the committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 7119)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 7119) to authorize the modification of the boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama, and for other purposes, having considered same, reports thereon, without amendment, with the recommendation that the bill do pass.

The passage of this bill is recommended by the President in his message to Congress on December 10, 1931, as follows: To the Congress of the United States:

I inclose a report by the Secretary of State requesting the submission anew to the present Congress of his recommendation for a modification of the boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama, so far as it affects that parcel of land in the Panama Canal Zone known as the Paitilla Point Military Reservation.

I recommend that the Congress enact the necessary legislation authorizing and empowering the Secretary of State to effect the modification of the boundary line as indicated in the attached draft of a proposed bill covering this matter.

HERBERT HOOVER. THE WHITE HOUSE, December 10, 1931.

The PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to refer to my report dated December 19, 1930, concerning the modification of the existing boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama so far as it affects that parcel of land in the Panama Canal Zone known as the Paitilla Point Military Reservation. This report was transmitted by you to the Congress on December 20, 1930, with the recommendation that the necessary legislation be enacted authorizing and empowering me to effect with the Republic of Panama the modification of the boundary line as indicated. Your recommendation and my report were printed as House Document No. 700, Seventy-first Congress. A copy thereof is attached for convenient information.

Bills S. 5570 and H. R. 15608, Seventy-first Congress, introduced on January 5, 1931, in the Senate and the House of Representatives, respectively, were intended to authorize and empower the Secretary of State to effect the proposed modification. The bill H. R. 15608 was reported favorably by the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives (H. Rept. 2271, 71st Cong.), and was passed by the House of Representatives on February 21, 1931. It was transmitted to the Senate on February 23, 1931, and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

As the Congress adjourned without further action on the bill having been taken, I have the honor to recommend that the matter be submitted anew to the consideration of the Seventy-second Congress.

For the convenience of the Congress, I attach a draft of a proposed bill covering this matter. Respectfully submitted.

HENRY L. STIMSON. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 11, 1931.

A BILL To authorize the modification of the boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the

Republic of Panama, and for other purposes Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That with respect to that parcel of land in the Panama Canal Zone known as the Paitilla Point Military Reservation, title to which was acquired by the Government of the United States under the conventions concluded on November 18, 1903, and September 2, 1914, between the United States and Panama, the Secretary of State be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered to effect with the Republic of Panama a modification of the boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama so that such line shall then run as follows:

Beginning at a concrete monument marked E, which is a point on the line on the north boundary of the Paitilla Point Military Reservation as shown on Panama Canal Drawing No. X-6053-1, whose geodetic coordinates are lat. 8° 58' plus 4,445.06 feet and long. 79° 31' plus 923.50 feet, and following along a course of S. 33° 00' E. for 790 feet to a concrete monument marked F; thence along a course of S. 21° 45' E. for a distance of 490 feet to a concrete monument marked G; thence along a course of S. 52° 00' W. for 870 feet to a concrete monument marked H; thence along a course of S. 76° 30' W. for 780 feet more or less to a point marked I on the map, which is an imaginary point located on the center line of the Matasnillo River, which forms the west boundary of the military reservation. All bearings are true. All coordinates are referred to the Panama Colon Datum.

SEC. 2. Nothing contained in this act shall be construed to authorize the Secretary of State to convey or to surrender to the Government of Panama the title which the Government of the United States now holds in that parcel of land which may be detached from the Panama Canal Zone by virtue of the provisions of section 1 of this act.

Sec. 3. No civil or criminal case that may be pending in the courts of the Panama Canal Zone at the time this act shall become effective shall be affected thereby either as to its present status or as to future proceedings, including final judgment or disposition.

The purpose of this bill is the modification of the existing boundary line between the Panama Canal Zone and the Republic of Panama, so far as it affects that parcel of land in the Panama Canal Zone known as the Paitilla Point Military Reservation.

It has been found advisable to use a portion of this land as the site for the erection of a residence for the American minister to Panama. It is necessary that such a residence be located within the boundaries of the Republic of Panama. By Executive Order No. 3322, dated September 1, 1920, the land in question was placed under the jurisdic

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