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BLACK CANYON OF THE GUNNISON, COLO., INCREASE, $4,200

Administration and protection; increase, $600.--An increase of $600 is recommended to provide for the services of an additional temporary ranger. There are two distinct subdivisions to the monument, the north and south rims, necessitating the employment of two rangers during the travel season to aid the visitors and protect the areas properly.

Maintenance, repair, and operation ; increase, $500.--The increased amount of $380 is needed to provide adequate maintenance for the two roads in the area and for the services of a part-time road-maintainer operator. An increase of $120 is included for repairs to the road maintainer proposed for purchase under the equipment account and for necessary repairs to 2 pick-up trucks.

Equipment; increase, $3,100.This increase is proposed for the purchase of a self-propelled, scarifier-type road maintainer, necessary to maintain the roads in proper condition, and for miscellaneous tools and equipment. The type of maintainer proposed for purchase requires but one operator and insures the most economical method of maintenance of the monument highways.

COLORADO, COLO.; INCREASE, $3,665

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $.345.--An increase of $230 is recommended for the maintenance of recently completed sections of the new Scenic Rim Highway being constructed with Public Works and roads and trails allotments. The increased sum of $93 is required for the maintenance and repair of pick-up truck, repairs to the road maintainers, and proper maintenance of the sanitation system.

Equipment; increase, $3,320.-This increase, plus the sum of $280 in the account, is necessary for the purchase of a motorcycle with sidecar for patrolling the completed sections of the new Scenic Rim Highway, a road maintainer for use on the approximately 20 miles of highway to be maintained upon the completion of the construction program, and for office equipment and small tools.

CRATERS OF THE MOON, IDAHO; DECREASE, $700 IN THE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

DEATH VALLEY, CALIF.; INCREASE, $5,490

Administration and protection; increase, $3,250.--An increase of $2,300 is urgently recommended for the employment of an assistant Superintendent. Travel to the monument in 1935 totiled 50,000 visitors, indicating the popularity of the area. The superintendent of Sequoia National Park, with headquarters 400 miles away, retains the general administration of Death Valley, but a competent, responsible officer residing in the monument is essential to represent the superintendent, to coordinate plans and activities, and to handle emergencies and problems as they arise. With an area of 2,510 square miles, over 500 miles of roads, and traveled by such a large number of visitors, additional ranger service is urgently needed. The sum of $9.50 is proposed for the employment of an additional temporary ranger for 6 months and for additional printing, photography, and supplies, such as gasoline, oil, and first-aid materials.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $4,270.--The sum of $2.000 is urgently recommended for the maintenance of approximately 300 miles of improved roads and nearly 400 miles of unimproved roads within the area. Only $300 was allotted for the purpose for the 1937 fiscal year. An increase of $250 is required for maintenance and repairs to 20 buildings, valued at $35,000, and constructed with emergency funds. An increased sum of $100 will be required to maintain three generating plants scheduled for purchase during the fiscal year 1937.

A radio set with semiportable sets distributed at vital points in the vast area provides the only means of communication. An increase of $750 is recommended to provide for a repairman during the busy winter months and for emergency service during the remainder of the year.

The maintenance of new sewage and water systems installed during the past several years with emergency funds will require an additional amount of $250. An increase of $270 is essential for the proper repair of trucks, machinery, and equipment, and the additional sum of $250 will be required to provide proper sanitation conveniences to safeguard the health of the large number of visitors. The increased sum of $400 is required for the operation of six additional sets

of quarters completed with Public Works funds and for two additional sets contemplated for construction during the present fiscal year.

Equipment.-Decrease, $2,030.

DEVILS TOWER, WYO.; DECREASE, $750 IN THE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

LEHMAN CAVES, NEV. ; DECREASE, $ 700 IN THE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

MOUNT OLYMPUS, WASH.; INCREASE, $3,720

Administration and protection; increase, $ 5,520.-An increase of $800 is retommended for the establishment of the position of superintendent at a salary of $3,200 per annun in lieu of the present position of custodian at $2,400) per annum. With the development of the area an additional sum of $1,000 will be required to provide sufficient supplies, such as gasoline, oil, fuel, and sundry supplies, travel expenses, rent of headquarters offices at Port Angeles, and for transportation charges. The sum of $2,720 is needed for the employment of an additional permanent ranger, a temporary ranger for 6 months, and for miscellaneous per-diem help, such as packers and laborers.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $600.—This increase is essential for the proper maintenance of approximately 115 miles of trails winding through rough country and subject to earth and rock slides, and for the maintenance, repair, and operation of a passenger vehicle transferred recently from Mount Rainier National Park.

Equipment; increase, $600.This increase is proposed for the purchase of a one-half ton pick-up truck necessary for the maintenance work of the area.

MUIR WOODS, CALIF. ; DECREASE, $380 IN THE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

OREGON CAVES, OREG.; DECREASE, $200 IN THE EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT

PETRIFIED FOREST, ARIZ. ; INCREASE, $ 6,706

Administration and protection: increase, $.1.306.-An increase of $1,656 (net) is recommended for the employment of a permanent clerk. This area comprises over 92.000 acres, with travel amounting to approximately 200,000 persons annually, and no provision has yet been made for clerical services.

With the proposed museum development and other activities in the recently acquired Painted Desert area, the present museum and educational work will be more than doubled. To meet this situation an increase of $1,400 is necessary for the employment of a ranger-naturalist for 6 months, for fuel and museum and educational supplies, and for the establishment of the position of assistant naturalist in lieu of the present position of junior naturalist. An additional sum of $1,250 is included to provide additional temporary ranger service, for ranger supplies, such as ga soline, oil, and first-aid supplies, and fuel for a nem ranger station.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $1,850.--The increased sum of $1,000 is urgently recommended to provide for the maintenance of 25 miles of newly paved highway, constructed with Public Works funds. Other increases required are: $100 for the adequate maintenance and repair of buildings: $11) for extensive repairs necessary for two electric generators; $75 for the maintenance of 19 miles of telephone line and two sewer systems constructed by Emergency Conservation Works activities; $125 for the general overhauling of machinery and equipment and for extensive repairs necessary for two 11.9-2011 and five 12-ton trucks, due to increased age; and $50 to provide additional sani: tation facilities due to the increased number of visitors and development of the Painted Desert area.

With the development of the water system in the Painted Desert area and the greater need for water at headquarters, due to increased travel, an additional sum of $:09 is meded or th: pro; r maintenance and supply of this important utility. An increase of $200 included to provide fuel for heating and cooking, electricity, and refrigeration for the additional personnel reconie mended for employment.

Equipment; Increase, $750.This increase is proposed for the purchase of a passenger car to replace a 1930 Ford sedan which will have passed the stage of economical operation by the 1938 fiscal year.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. I see that your appropriation for 1937 was $167,000 and that you are estimating for this year $205,600. I presume this increase of $38,600 is due to the same causes that you have mentioned at these other points?

Mr. DEMARAY. Yes. You probably know that this covers an item for all of the national monuments, of which there are 71. However, there are only 45 monuments that actually have funds allotted to them, which range from $50 in a small monument in South Dakota to the largest sum of $24,590 in Death Valley, Calif. The travel, however, is a million and a half people annually to these areas.

SOUTHWESTERN MONUMENTS, GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

Mr. SCRUGHAM. In this item of general administration of the Southwestern national monuments, is any of that money expended at Washington ?

Mr. DEMARAY. No. That is expended in the field.
Mr. SCRUGHAM. Is that spent for supervision of the monuments?

Mr. DEMARAY. Frank Pinkley who is the superintendent of all the Southwestern monuments, which include the great archeological areas, is located at Casa Grande National Monument; and the assistant superintendent is located there also.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. This is designed to cover their travel expenses? Mr. DEMARAY. Yes. And their salaries.

METHOD OF COUNTING VISITORS

Mr. LAMBERTSON. How do you arrive at the number of people who visit the monuments? You don't have any men at most of them, do you?

Mr. DEMARAY. We only count those at the 45 monuments at which we have men stationed.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. You don't count them at the other monuments?
Mr. DEMARAY. No. We don't try to count them there.

FEES FOR VISITORS

Mr. O'NEAL. Do you charge any fees at any of these monuments?

Mr. DEMARAY. No. There is no fee at the present time. We are going to propose some parking fees at a number of these areas. In other words, the monuments are largely small. The traveler enters on the road and parks in a designated area. We are proposing to charge a series of parking fees in these monuments.

Mr. O'NEAL. Don't you think that the service that you render would justify a fee?

Mr. DEMARAY. Yes, sir.

Mr. CAMMERER. It would be all right if it would just pay for the cost of keeping the camps clean. We have to have a man to clean up the waste matter that they leave around.

PETRIFIED FOREST, ARIZ. Mr. SCRUGHAM. Why does the appropriation for the Petrified Forest item run higher than the others? I can understand why some of those other areas should be large, but why should the item for the Petrified Forest be larger?

Mr. DEMARAY. It is on one of the main highways.
Mr. SCRUGHAM. You mean that there is heavy traffic there?
Mr. DEMARAY. There is very heavy traffic there.

Mr. CAMMERER. It is pretty well known throughout the country, and everybody wants to go to the Petrified Forest.

HOMESTEAD NATIONAL MONUMENT OF AMERICA, NEBR.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. On page 427 you have a new item for the Homestead National Monument.

Mr. DEMARAY. That is a separate item and we have a separate justification for that, as follows:

An appropriation of $24,000 is recommended, as authorized in Public, No. 480, Seventy-fourth Congress, approved March 19, 1936, for the acquisition on behalf of the United States by gift, purchase, or condemnation “the south half of the northwest quarter, the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter, and the southwest quarter of the northeast quarter section 26, township 4 north, range east, of the sixth principal meridian, Gage County, Nebr., the same being the first homestead entered upon under the General Homestead Act of May 20, 1862, by Daniel Freeman, and that when so acquired, the said area be designated 'The Homestead National Monument of America'", and for the development of the said national monument area in an appropriate manner, to wit, the erection of a suitable memorial emblematic of the hardships and the pioneer life through which the early settlers passed in the settlement, cultivation, and civilization of the great West, and for the construction of suitable buildings for museum purposes.

of the total amount recommended, the sum of $16,000 is estimated as neces. sary for land acquisition and $8,000 for buildings, monuments, etc.

Mr. LAMBERTSON. What is the purpose of this new monument in Nebraska?

Mr. DEMARAY. That was authorized by an act of Congress approved March 19, 1936 (49 Stat., p. 1184). It authorizes an appropriation of $24,000, and that item is now submitted in this bill.

Mr. LAMBERTSON. Where is it and what is it?

Mr. SCRUGHAM. What particular merit does this homestead possess to warrant this appropriation ?

Mr. DEMARAY. This homestead was the first homestead entry entered under the General Homestead Act of May 20, 1862, by Daniel Freeman. In the act authorizing its acquisition it said: For the acquisition on behalf of the United States by gift, purchase, or condemnation.

And then it gives the legal description of itIn section 26, township 4 north, range 5 east, of the sixth principal meridian, Gage County, Nebr., the same being the first homestead entered upon under the General Homestead Act of May 20, 1862, by Daniel Freeman, and that when so acquired, the said area be designated "The Homestead National Monument of America", and for the development of the said national monument area in an appropriate manner, to wit, the erection of a suitable memorial emblematic of the hardships and the pioneer life through which the early settlers passed in the settlement, cultivation, and civilization of the great West, and for the construction of suitable buildings for museum purposes.

We have had our men out there, and we estimate that it will cost $16,000 to acquire the land. Then there will be $8,000 for buildings and markings, and so on.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. Isn't this most unusual for you to have to purchase the land for a national monument?

Mr. CAMMERER. It happens to be the first homestead, and it is in private ownership.

I suppose, if I might make a special plea for this—I was born in a sod house not far from this place, so that I know something about the early pioneer life out there.

This homestead was the first one entered upon under the homestead law of 1862. Daniel Freeman was a Union soldier, home on leave; and in order that he might enter this first homestead, they opened up the office at midnight and gave him the first opportunity to enter; and he entered and went away to war.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. It was during the Civil War?
Mr. CAMMERER. Yes, sir. In 1862.

The purpose of this monument is—and I think it is a very commendable purpose to make this a show place, a museum place, to display artifacts and implements that the early pioneers used. In other words, it is a memorial to the energy and the effort and the determination of the early pioneers. And it is a good place to do it in.

Mr. O'NEAL. What is there at this site?
Mr. CAMMERER. Just a farm place.
Mr. DEMARAY. It is the first homestead under the Homestead Act.

Mr. Rich. What is it going to cost annually, from your best experience with this kind of property, to take care of it after you get it?

Mr. DEMARAY. No doubt we will have to have a superintendent. It will depend largely on the number of people who go there.

Mr. Rich. What will be the salary of the superintendent?
Mr. DEMARAY. He will get about $2,600.

Mr. Rich. How many attendants and assistants will you have there?

Mr. DEMARAY. He may have to have during the summer season probably two temporary rangers, I would say, at $1,860. That would give him two men during the summertime.

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARKS AND MONUMENTS

Mr. SCRUGHAM. The next item is National Historical Parks and Monuments.

Mr. DEMARAY. I wish to submit the following justification: This estimate of $127,000 is to provide for administration, protection, maintenance, and improvement of the following areas during the fiscal year 1938: Abraham Lincoln National Park, Ky

$8,000 Colonial National Historical Park, Va-----

66, 940 George Washington Birthplace National Monument, Va--

17, 250 Lee Mansion (Arlington), Va---

15, 210 Morristown National Historical Park, N. J

19, 600

Total.---

127,000 Abraham Lincoln National Park, comprising 110 acres, was established by act approved July 17, 1916, to preserve the farm on which is situated the log-cabin birthplace of Abraham Lincoln.

Colonial National Historical Park comprises 6,150.50 acres, and was established to depict the Colonial history of America from its beginning at Jamestown in 1607, through its momentous development at Williamsburg, to its culmination at Yorktown in 1781. The area was established as a national monument by proclamation December 30, 1930, and changed to a national historical park by act approved June 5, 1936.

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