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Q. For a month 1-A. No, sir; 15 or 16 days.

Q. Whether or not a particular man or another were released by their chief from duty on the day of the election; you know nothing about that?—No, sir.

By Mr. WILSON: Q: Do you pay policemen at the end of each month, or at the middle and the end iA. The middle and the end.

By Mr. Peelle: Q. Policemen are frequently excused, from various causes, that are not off the pay roli 1-A. That is not in my department.

Q. Don't you know they are frequently excused from some cause, and their name still appear on the pay-roll l-A. Yes, sir; I know the" are frequently excused.

Q. And they get their pay just the same, do they not 1-A. No; I do not know that to be a fact.

By Mr. Wilson:
Q. You are a Republican, are you l-A. Yes, sir.

JOS. T. MAGNER.

Exhibit No. 1 to deposition of Jos. T. Magner.-P. C. Hendricks, N. P.

Pay-roll of the officers and members of the police force of the city of Indianapolis for the

half month ending Nov. 15, 1882.

Names.

Rank.

No. of Rate per
days. day.

Amount

Dols. cta.

Chief
Capt.

2 50

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66

Dols. cts

54 33 37 50 37 50 37 50 37 50 30 00 30 60 28 00 30 00 30 00

Patrol

2 00

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44

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30 00 30

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30 00 30 00 28 00 18 00 30 00 30 00

Rob't C. Williamson
Rob't Campbell
Chris. McGregor
Edward W. Nicholson.
Timothy Splan
Samuel Barker
George W. Baxter
Chas, O. Britton
William Bacon
A. J. Buchanan
Bradley Connett
Worthington Clary
Chas. Clark
Jas. J. Cullings
G. L. Craven
Leonard Crane.
Geo. W, Cheatham.
Allen Dudley
Geo. H Emory
Fred Fells
Samuel Gerber.
Ben. W. Hartley
Henry Holt.
Edward Harris
William Harnes
Allen Jester
A. R. Lewis.
John Lowe
Gen. W. McCain
V. S. McMullen
Samuel McCinre
John Mountain
Daniel M. Osburn.
Henry P'ope
George Prier
H.

M. Patton.
David Richards.
William Roney
Webb Robertson
Michael Rafterry
John Reid
Joseph Sternen
Joseph Schmid
WE Shilling
G. L. K. Standridge
Hugb P. Stewart
Henry Slate
Benj. Thornton
Jno. J. Trimame
Albert Travis.

month.

15 15 15 15 15 15 14 15 15 15 15 15 14 15 15 14

9 15 15 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 10 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

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Pay-roll of the officers and members of the police force, fc.-Continued.

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5 days allowed Patrolman Clark while disabled from pistol wound, and 6 days extra on account of election.

INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 15, 1882. I bereby certify that the terms of service and amounts affixed to the several names on this pay-roll are correct.

ROBERT C. WILLIAMSON,

Chief of Police. Examined and approved.

JOHN R. PEARSON.
H. B. STOUT.

Board of Police. OFFICE OF CITY CLERK:

I, Joseph T. Magner, clerk of the city of Indianapolis, hereby certify that the fore. going is a true and correct copy of the original pay-roll now on file in my office.

Witness my hand and the seal of the city of Indianapolis this 15th day of December, 1883. (SEAL.]

JOS. T. MAGNER,

City Clerk. OFFICE OF CITY CLERK:

I, Joseph T. Magner, clerk of the city of Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, hereby certify that at sessions of the common council and board of aldermen of said city said bodies made an appropriation to I. N. Pattison, city treasurer, for payment of extra police, the item of appropriation being as follows: "I. N. Pattison, city treas., for pay of 128 special policemen, for services rendered Nov. 7th, 1882, $256.00.” All of which is shown by records now on file in my office.

Witness my hand and the seal of the city of Indianapolis this 15th day of December, 1883. [SEAL)

JOS. T. MAGNER,

City Clerk. (Indorsed :) Exhibit No. 1. Deposition of Jos. T. Magner. P. C. Hendricks.

John Carlon, being first duly sworn, testified as follows:

Direct examination by Mr. Wilsox:
Q. State your name.-A. John Carlon.
Q. Your age and residence ?-A. Age, 44; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.
Q. You are the same Mr. Carlon that testified in chief ?-A. Yes, sir.

Q. In that examination yon testified that you bad been in the printing business for a number of years 1--A. Yes, sir.

Q. I call your attention to a ticket headed “Democratic ticket," and marked Exhibit No. 4, to the deposition of D. M. Ransdell, Paul C. Hendricks, notary publie, and I will ask you what is the material upon which that ticket is printed i-A. That is what we call a No. 2 book paper, of light weight.

Q. I call your attention to a ticket marked Exhibit No. 3, to the deposition of D. M. Ransdell, Paul C. Hendricks, notary public, and headed “Republican ticket," and I will ask you what that material is ?-A. I should say that that is a No. 1 book papier, sized and supercalendered. It might possibly be a tlat paper. Yon cannot tell the difference between the two.

Q: What is tlat paper?-A. Flat paper is the same as writing paper ; we call it * folio," and " cap.'

Q. I call your attention to a ticket headed “Republican ticket," · State ticket." for governor, Albert G. Porter; for lieutenant-governor, Thomas Hanna, and marked Exhibit C to the deposition of William Wallace, Paul C. Hendricks, notars public: I will ask you what that is ? ---A. I should say that paper is a thin folio writing paper.

Q. Is it a writing paper ?-A. It is soiled; it is pretty hard to tell; but I should say it was about a fourteen-pound folio, or a light cap.

Objected to as not rebuttal. The ticket was offered in evidence as a part of the deposition of the witness, and will be found attached hereto, marked Exbibit No. 1. Iis admission being objected to by the contestee as not proper rebuttal.)

Q. I band you a ticket headed “ Republican ticket"; for governor, Albert G. Porter: I will ask you if that is the same material as the one I have shown you.

(Objected to as not rebuttal )

A. That is about the same. This sindicating) is a little better finished-the one you have just handel me.

Q. Is not that due to the fact that it has not been handled ?-A. Very likely, that has a great deal to do with it, but this paper is about the same as the other.

Q. I hand you a ticket headed “Democratic ticket," with a tag on it, and reading: “For Governor Franklin Landers," marked Exhibit Z shown to J. A. Wildnian; I will ask you what is the material upon wbich that is printed ?-A. That is what we call No. 2 cheap book paper.

Q. I will show you a ticket headed “Democratic ticket;" for Governor Franklin Landers," with a tag on it; and I will ask you if that corresponds with it!-A. Yes, sir ; that is the same paper.

(The ticket was offered in evidence and will be found attached to this deposition as a part thereof, marked Exhibit No. 2.)

Q. I call your attention to a ticket headed “Democratic Ticket;" for President, Wintield Scott Hancock, and marked Exhib t E to the deposition of William Wallace, and I will ask you what is the material upon which that is printed !- A. That is No. 2, or a cheap book paper.

Q. I band you the ticket marked Exhibit F to the deposition of William Wallace, headed Republican Ticket"; for President, Janies A. Garfield, and I will ask you what material that is printed on.-A. That is a pretty dirty sheet and it is pretty hard to tell; I should think this was a heavy book paper.

Q. I show you a ticket headed “Republican Ticket"; for President, James A. Garfield, and I will ask you, does that correspond with the exhibit just shown you lA. No; the paper is different paper; it is a little different paper, or else this Exhibit F is dirty:

Q: Is it not true that the only difference is that one is dirty and the other is not? A. I suppose it is the same kind of paper, only one is a little different color from the other.

Q. What sort of paper do you say it is !-A. That is flat paper; it is folio. (The specimen was offered in evidence, and will be found attached hereto as a part of this deposition and marked Exhibit No. 3.)

Q. I call your attention to a ticket marked Exbibit No. 6 to the deposition of Henry c. Adams, Paul C. Hendricks, notary public; is that the ticket used by the Repnblicans in the last election ?-A. I did not see any body vote the ticket; I could not say it was the ticket that was used by them.

Q. Did you see that ticket at the polls ?-A. I saw that ticket at the polls, or some. thing similar to that.

Q. I show you Exhibit S, shown to J. S. Gordon, and marked Paul C. Hendricks, notary public; is that the Democratic ticket that was used November, 1832, at the last Congressional election ?--A. Yes, sir.

Q. I ask you now to take these Democratic tickets that I have shown you—one marked Exhibit No. 4 to the deposition of D. M. Ransdell, headed for secretary of state, John G. Shanklin; one headed for governor, Franklin Lauders, with a flag on it, and marked Exhibit Z to J. A. Wildman's depositiou, and one marked Democratic ticket: for President, Winfield Scott Hancock, and marked Exhibit E to William Wallace's deposition, and one headed Democratic ticket, for secretary of state, Will.

a

iam R. Myers, and marked Exhibit S to Mr. Gordon's evidence-and I will ask you to compare them and state what dissimilarity, or what similarity, there is between the tickets as to the material upon which they are printed and their width.-A. They are paper No. 2, or a cheap quality of book paper. This (Exhibit S, referred to) is a little the best quality, but they are all the same.

Q. That is a little the best quality ?-A. Yes, sir

Q. As to their relative thickness 1-A. Three are about the same thickness. This [indicating) is a little lighter.

Q. The Democratic ticket marked Exhibit No. 4 is a little the lightest 1-A. Yes, sir; these two sindicating) are the lightest.

Q. The Democratic ticket headed “Winfield Scott Hancock," and the Democratic ticket headed “John G. Shanklin” are a little the lightest 1-A. Yes, sir.

Q. Per ream-A. Yes, sir.
Q. The others are similari-A. Yes, sir; only a little bit heavier.

Q. Are they or are they not the same class of paper 1-A. Yes, sir; it is the same class of paper. One is a little bit heavier than the other, and it is of a little different shade. I think that is brought on from old age.

Q. I would like for you to measure the width of those tickets.-A. They are all three inches, or intended for that, I suppose; that one (indicating ) is not quite three inches.

Q. That is the Winfield Scott Hancock ticket 1-A. Yes, sir.
Q. How much does it lack 1-A. About one-sixteenth, I judge.

Q. The Democratic ticket No. 4 to the deposition of D. M. Ransdell is three inches A. Yes, sir.

Q. And i he Democratic ticket voted in 1882 for William R. Myers, marked Exhibit S to deposition of Mr. Gordon, is how much ?-A. Three inches.

Q And the Democratic ticket with the flag at the head of it, marked Exhibit 2, is how much ?-A. That is about three inches and a quarter, I should judge.

Q. Now, I call your attention to the Republican ticket, Exhibit No. 3, headed “Republican ticket, for secretary of State, Isaac S. Moore," and Exhibit C to the deposition of William Wallace, headed “Republican ticket, for governor, Albert G. Porter,” and marked Exhibit F to the deposition of William Wallace, and the national Ré. publican ticket for James A. Garfield, and marked Exhibit No. to the deposition of Henry C. Adams, and I will ask you to compare those tickets as to material, and state whether there is any difference in the material upon which those tickets are printed ?-A. I should say this was No. 1 sized and supercalendered book.

Q. That is Exhibit 3 to D. M. Ransdell's deposition ?--A. Yes, sir.

Q. No. 6 to the deposition of Henry C. Adams is what i-A, I should judge that was a kind of a plate paper.

Q. Exhibit C to the the deposition of William Wallace, as compared with the others, is what 1-A. It is about 14 pound folio. It looks to me that it is writing paper.

Q. Exhibit F to the deposition of William Wallace, as compared with the other Republican tickets, is what ?-A. It is dirty; and, as I remarked before, I could not hardly tell. That looks like it was a No. 2, or some kind of book paper.

Q. The titiket, you said a while ago, was flat paper ?-A. That is the other one I showed you.

Q. That was made an exhibit to your evidence ?-A. The other one was-the one I said was tlat paper, but ditferent color from this.

Q. Yon mean the other ticket corresponding with that?--A. The other ticket the size of this ; not this one.

Q. The exhibit I showed you, headed “Republican ticket," James A. Garfield for President, that specimen was made an exhibit to your evidence you say is a little different from the Republican ticket for James A. Gartield for President, which is exhibit No. F 10 th deposition of William Wallace ?-A. Yes, sir; it seems to be.

Q. Now, as to weight and thickness, how do these Republican tickets correspond with each other'-A. These four?

Q. Yes, sir?-A. There is a great difference between the thinnest and thickest of them.

Q. How do they compare between themselves as to uniformity with the Democratic tickets, as to uniformity between themselves ?-A. There is no uniformity between any of these four Republican tickets; they are all of different thicknesses, and different gratles of paper.

Q. Measure the width of these four Republican tickets, and state what it is 7-A. This ticket (indicating ) is about one thirty-second of an inch over three inches.

Q. That is Exhibit No. 3 to the deposition of Mr. Ransdell?-A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the Republican ticket marked Exhibit No. 6 to the deposition of H. C. Adams, is what I-A. Three inches.

Q. And the Republican ticket voted for James A. Garfield, and marked Exhibit F, is how much 1-A. That is about two inches and three-quarters. Q. About a quarter of an inch less than three inches 1-A. Yes, sir.

H. Mis. 23-32

Q. And the Republican ticket marked Exhibit C to the deposition of William Wallace, is what width1-A. That is two inches and three-quarters.

Q. Now, I ask you as to the appearance and finish of the Republican tickets, as compared between themselves, and the finish and appearance of the Democratic tickets; what is the difference, if any, and how do they compare?-A. The difference in the Democratic tickets is very slight; there may be a little difference in the color, but there is a great deal bigger difference between the Republican tickets. The Re. publican tickets are from 14-pound folio, rp 10–I should judge, plate paper.

Q. What is the effect of super-sizing paper; you said that the Republican paper was super-sized 1-A. That puts au extra tinish on it.

Q. What effect does it bave upon the appearance l-A. It has the appearance of a glossy, hard tinish.

Q. I will ask you if you have examined recently a treatise published in Indiana, called “Buskirk's Practice”; have you examined it to see what kind of paper it is on 1-A. Yes, sir.

Q. I ask you to look at this ticket headed “Republican ticket," marked Exhibit 6 to the deposition of H. C. Adams, and state what difference there is, if you know, between the material upon which the Republican ticket is printed and the inaterial npon which “ Buskirk's Practice” is printed.-A. This book (the book in question was handed to the witness) is printed on a good quality of No. 2 book paper, and the ticket is printed on plate paper.

Q. I ask you as to the difference in the thickness of the two ?-A. There is a great deal of difference in the thickness of the two.

Q. What is the difference in the weight l-A. This paper of “Buskirk's Practice" weighs, I should think, about 60 or 70 pounds to the ream.

Q. What does that Republican ticket weight-A. That is 28 by 42 in size.
Q. And that Republican ticket?-A. Depends upon the size.

Q. Taking it the same size?-A. I should judge it would weigh 115 or 120 poundsalmost one-half more.

Q. You said just now that one was thicker than the other; which did you mean was the thickest ?-A. I mean the ticket.

Q: Did you ever examine any of Houghten, Mifflin & Co.'s red-line publications, A. I examined one of them; yes, sir.

Q. I will ask yon what is the difference in the thickness of the paper upon which those red-line editions of the books of that firm are printed and that Republican ticket just shown you?

(Objected to as not rebuttal, and for the further reason that the book testified to be Mr. Merril has not been identified by name.)

A. This Republican ticket is a great deal thicker than the paper in that book. Looking at the book, I would judge it was a very light, super-calendered paper. I saw it at Mr. Yohn's when I came up, and it was a very thin, light paper.

Q. Calling your attention to Exhibit No. 3 to the deposition of W.0. Anderson, being the price-list of Chatfield & Woods, I ask you to look at the catalogue of sizes of their book papers; and I will ask you if book papers are sold, or if yon find in the catalogue of prices there any grade of book paper of size 19 by 24 1-A. No, sir; ! know there is not, without looking over the catalogue. It is not in the trade, and it is not a regular size. Q. Do catalogues agree on that subject :-A. Generally. Q. Is book paper sold in the trade 19 by 24 ?--A. No, sir; not in that size.

Q. Do you know the reason of that?–4. I do not know; it is a size that is never nged without

Q. Never mind; I will not ask you any further; I know the reason, and I thought you did I-A. No, sir; I do not.

Q. I will ask you if there are not regular sizes of paper for printing books I–A. Regular sizes of paper; yes, sir.

Q. Do you know the sizes of books; what they are called in the molds 1-A. No, sir; I do not. I know the sizes of the paper.

Q. What are the sizes of the paper 1-A. 22 by 32, 24 by 36, 25 by 38, 28 by 42, are the book-paper sizes.

Q. Is it not true that the sizes of book paper are cut to fit, in folding, the size of the book; for example, from “octavo," “duodecimo," quarto, &c., that they cut the sheets for the sizes, in printing !-A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is there any size in the manufacture of books such that you can fold paper 19 by 24, and print on that size, that you know of 1-A. No, sir; I pover saw one that I know of; there may be some books.

Cross-examination by Mr. PEELLE: Q. I hand you a specimen of ticket which was just handed you by Mr. Wilson, headed “Democratic ticket. For Governor, Franklin Landers.” Is that one of the tickets used by the Democrats in this city in 1880 1-A. I do not remember about that.

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