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Sau-van-no-gee,

We-wo-cau,
Mook-lau-sau,

Puc-cun-tal-lau has-see,
A-la-ba-mo,

Woc-co-coie,
Hook-choie-oo-che,

Po-chuse-hat-che.
0-che-ub-e-fau,

These towns furnished the warriors for the expedition against Tensau. They did not intend an expedition against the white people till they compelleil Cowetau and Tookaubatchee to join or fly the nation, and every town to join with them. But being attacked by the half breeds and whites, at Burnt Corn, in their own land, they determined to retaliate, and planned the expedition accordingly.

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These are neutral. Ho-bo-kei-eth-le Haujo, hearing that the war party intended to cut off Kialije, sent word he had warriors, and would fight for Kialijee. This last town has taken the war club, and dance the prophets *dances, and are used as spies on the war party.

Too-to-gau-gee,

Au-che-nau ulgau.

These are at Tookaubatche Tal-lau-has-see. Chattuck-so-cau is above Oc-fus-kee and with it.

This settlement is on the east of Tallapoosa, on a wide creek which gives name to it, twelve miles nearly from the river.

From Burges's 30 miles above the mouth of the river Flint,
To We-thluc-coo-chee, 16 miles, 20 yards wide.
O-ke-lock-ei-me, 18 miles, 30 yds wide, and deep.
St. Marks, 40 miles,

half a mile wide. Aussille, 40 miles,

50 yards wide, shallow. Sāwaune, 70 miles,

120 yards wide. Picaulātā, 130 miles,

two miles wide, St. Augustine,

26 miles.

Informatlon relative to the waters and country on the post road, commencing at Ka-le-be, near the agency on that creek.

All waters of
A-la-ba-ma.

Miles. Width in feet. Ka-le-be,

30 Ke-bi-hatch-e, 4 30 lands post oak, clay, good

range for stock. O-fuk-she,

2 60 post oak, small hickory, clay,

red oak. Noo-coose Chepo, 2 8 post oak, plains, clay, red oak. Kit-to-me, 14 60 post, black oak, plains, clay. Pilth-lau-le, 7 20 do.

do. Pinchunc, 2 20 do.

do. In-tuck-kee, 4 10 do.

do. Opil-thluc-co, 6 10 do.

do. 1st Fork of, 3 10

do.

do. 2d do 3 15 do.

do. Us-se-wau-sau,

4 4 oak, hickory, chesnut, water

Ko-ne-cau.
10 first pine land, left 4 by 5

miles, clay. Suck-pul-gau, 23 15 oak, hickory, walnut.

3 pine ridge to Ko-ne-cau, wide

in places, 10 to 15 miles

level clay land. Murder Creek, 8 20 a belt of pine land 5 by 4

miles, clay. Burnt Corn, 12 10 between these creeks on the

left. Limestone,

5

a small branch of Alabama. Little Escambia, 4 20 waters of Ko-ne-cau. Big Escambia, 9 90

do. do.

The pine lands commence near Burnt Corn, around the head of Limestone, to the two Escambias, and to Ko-necau. Half

Half way from Burnt Corn to Little Escambia, the pine land loses the quality of clay, and is sandy, the pine tall and large.

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APPENDIX.

INDIAN TREATIES.

TREATY AT AUGUSTA, JUNE 1, 1773.

BY SIR JAMES WRIGHT AND JOHN STEWART, WITH THE CHEROKEES AND CREEKS.

This treaty fixes the eastern bounds of the Cherokees to be from the tree marked by the Cherokees, near the head of a branch falling into the Oconee river, and from thence to Savannah river.

TREATY AT HOPEWELL, NOVEMBER 28, 1785.

From Tugalo river, “thence a direct line to the top of Currohe moun. tain ; thence to the head of the South fork of Oconee river."

In 1803, at the treaty near Fort Wilkinson, this boundary admitted by the Creeks, and that a line from the High Shoals of Apalatche, along the old path to Sauwanna, on Chat-to-ho-che, bounds the Creek claims on this quarter.

TREATY AT NEW YORK, AUGUST 7, 1790.

ARTICLE III.

" The Creek Nation shall deliver, as soon as practicable, to the commanding officer of the troops of the United States, stationed at the Rocklanding on the Oconee river, all citizens of the United States, white in. habitants or negroes, who are now prisoners in any part of said nation. And if any such prisoners or negroes should not be so delivered on or before the 1st day of June ensuing, the Governor of Georgia may empower three persons to repair to the said Nation in order to claim and receive such prisoners and negroes.

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TREATY AT COLERAIN, JUNE.29, 1796.

ARTICLE VII.

“ The Creek Nation shall deliver, as soon as practicable, to the Super. intendent of Indian affairs, at such place as he may direct, all citizens of the United States, white inhabitants and negroes, who are now pris. oners in any part of the said Nation, agreeable to the treaty of New York, and also all citizens, white inhabitants, negroes and property taken since the signing of that treaty. And if any such prisoners, negroes or property should not be delivered, on or before the first day of January next, the Governor of Georgia may empower three persons to repair to the said Nation, in order to claim and receive such prisoners, negroes, and property, under the direction of the President of the United States."

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