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Lamb. This tender and original little piece seems clearly to reveal the work of that noble-minded and afflicted sister, who was at once the lappiness, the misery, and the life-long blessing of her equally

noble-minded brother. 278 289 This poem has an exultation and a glory, joined with

an exquisiteness of expression, which place it in the highest rank among the many masterpieces of its

illustrious Author. 289 300 interlunar xwoon : interval of the moon's invisi.

bility. 294 304 Culpe : Gilbraltar. Lofoten : the Maelstrom whirl

pool off the N. W. coast of Norway. 295 305 This lovely poem refers here and there to a ballad by

Hamilton on the subject better treated in 163 and

104. 307 315 Arcturi: seemingly used for northern stars. Anl

wild roses, de. Our language has perhaps no line

modulated with more subtle sweetness. 308 316 Coleridge describes this poem as the fragment of a

dream-vision,-- perhaps, an opium-dream?-which composed itself in his mind when fallen asleep after reading a few lines about the Khan Kubla' in

Purchas' Pilgrimage. 312 318 Ceres' duughter : Proserpine. God of Torment:

Pluto. 320 321 The leading idea of this beautiful description of a

day's landscape in Italy appears to be-On the voyage of life are many moments of pleasure, given by the sight of Nature, who has power to heal even the

worldliness and the uncharity of man. 321 1. 23 Amphitrite was daughter to Ocean. 325 322 l. 21 Maenad: a frenzied Nymph, attendant on

Dionysos in the Greek mythology. May we not call this the most vivid, sustained, and impassioned amongst all Shelley's magical personifications of

Nature ? 326 1. 5 Plants under water sympathize with the seasons

of the land, and hence with the winds which affect

them. 327 323 Written soon after the death, by shipwreck, of

Wordsworth's brother John. This poem may be profitably compared with Shelley's following it. Each is the most complete expression of the innermost spirit of his art given by these great Poets :-of that Idea which, as in the case of the true Painter, (to quote the words of Reynolds,) 'subsists only in the mind : The sight never beheld it, nor has the hand expressed it: it is an idea residing in the breast of the artist, which he is always labouring to impart, PAGE NO. 331 328 st. 4 this folk : its has been here plausibly but, per.

and which he dies at last without imparting.' 328 the Kind: the human race. 831 327 the Royal Suint: Henry VI.

haps, unnecessarily, conjectured. -Every one knows the general story of the Italian Renaissance, of the Revival of Letters -- From Petrarch's day to our own, that ancient world has renewed its youth: Poets and artists, students and thinkers, have yielded themselves wholly to its fascination, and deeply penetrated its spirit. Yet perhaps no one more truly has vivified, whilst idealising, the picture of Greek country life in the fancied Golden Age, than Keats in these lovely (if somewhat unequally executed) stanzas :-his quick imagination, by a kind of 'natural magic,' more than supplying the scholarship which his youth had no opportunity of gaining.

105 134 These stanzas are by Richard Verstegan (-c. 1635)

a poet and antiquarian, published in his rare Odes (1601), under the title Our Blessed Ladies Lullaby, and reprinted by Mr. Orby Shipley in his beautiful Carmina Mariana (1893). The four stanzas here given form the opening of a hymn of twenty-four.

B B

INDEX OF WRITERS

WITH DATES OF BIRTH AND DEATH

NUMBER

ALEXANDER, William (1580-1640).

To Aurora

xxix

ccvii

xlv

хс

clxxiv
clxxx
clxxxi
ccviii

BARBAULD, Anna Lætitia (1743-1825).

To Life
BARNEFIELD, Richard (16th century).

The Nightingale
BEAUMONT, Francis (1586–1616).

On the Tombs in Westminster Abbey
BLAKE, William (1757-1827).

Love's Secret
Infant Joy
A Cradle Song .

To the Muses
Burns, Robert (1759-1796).

Lament for Culloden
A Farewell
Ye banks and braes o' bonnie doon
To a Mouse
Mary Morison
Bonnie Lesley :
O my Luve's like a red, red rose
Highland Mary
Duncan Gray
Jean

John Anderson
BYRON, George Gordon Noel (1788–1824)

clxi
clxviii
clxxvi
clxxxiv
clxxxviii
. clxxxix
. exc
cxci
cxciii
. cxcvi
cxcvji

All for Love
There be none of Beauty's daughters
She walks in beauty, like the night
When we two parted

ccxii
ccxiv
ccxvi
ccxxxiv

NUMBER
ccxlvi
. ccliii

cclxvi
cclxxv

CCXXV
ccxxxi
ccxli
cel
cci
cclix
. ccxcy
. ccciv
. cccx
cccxiv
cccxxxii

BYRON, G. G. N. (continue).

Elegy on Thyrza
On the Castle of Chillon :
Youth and Age

Elegy
CAMPBELL, Thomas (1777-1844).

Lord Ullin's Daughter .
To the Evening Star .
Earl March look'd on his dying child
Ye Mariners of England
Battle of the Baltic
Hohenlinden
The Beech Tree's Petition
Ode to Winter
Song to the Evening Star
The Soldier's Dream.

The River of Life
Campion, Thomas (c. 1567–1620).

Basia
Advice to a Girl
In Imagine Pertransit Homo
Sleep, angry beauty, sleep.
A Renunciation
O Crudelis Amor
Sic Transit
The man of life upright
A Hyron in Praise of Neptune

Fortunati Nimium
CAREw, Thomas (1589-1639).

The True Beauty
Carey, Henry (--1743).

Sally in our Alley
CIBBER, Colley (1671-1757).

The Blind Boy
COLERIDGE, Hartley (1796–1849).

XXV
xxvi
1
lii
lv
lix
Ixxvi
lxxix
ci
. cxliii

cxii

clxvii

clv

She is not fair to outward view

ccxviii

ccxi
cccxvi
cccxxix

COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor (1772–1834).

Love (Genevieve)
Kubla Khan

Youth and Age
COLLINS, John (18th century).

Tomorrow
COLLINS, William (1720-1756).

Ode to Simplicity
Ode written in 1746
The Passions
Ode to Evening

covi

cliii
clx
clxxviii
clxxxvi

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