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On September 18, 1911, Henry R. IIowland, of Buffalo, administrator, with the will annexed, delivered to the Society the following portions of the personal estate: Books and pamphlets

$3,802 00 Live stock

115 75 Carriages, harness and farm implements

2,005 00 Contents of Museum

4,210 00 Household effects, farm produce, etc.

4,001 66

$14,134 +1

The settlement of the estate has not been completed at this writ ing, and the funds have not yet been made available for use.

Manor Hall Fund, ('ochran Gift. As stated in former Reports, the late Mrs. William F. Cochran, donor of the $50,000 by means of which the Philipse Manor IIall at Yonkers, N. Y., was given to the State to be in our custody, intimated before her death her desire to contribute $5,000 toward the renovation of the historic building. Since our last Report, this desire has been carried into effect by the executor of her estate and the $5,000 paid into the treasury of this Society. In addition thereto Mrs. Cochran's son, Alexander Smith Cochran, of Yonkers, has given to the Society the sum of $11,500 for the same purpose. In order that the various matters relating to the Manor Ilall may be collated in one place, we have given an accounting of this fund under the heading of Philipse Manor Hall," on page 94, following:

STONY POINT BATTLEFIELD STATE RESERVATION.

Maintenance and Improrement. Stony Point Battlefield State Reservation consists of thirty-four acres of land on the peninsula of Stony Point, on the west shore of the Iludson River, twelve miles south of West Point. It was created and placed in the custody of this Society pursuant to chapter 764 of the Laws of 1897.

During the past year the park has been maintained in good condition, with only small expenditure upon the roads, paths and

buildings. By prompt attention to the first signs of gulleying and wear, the hilly roads have withstood the effects of the elements and traffic remarkably well.

The new concrete steamboat dock has been completed by the addition of floating fenders on either side, the driving of twentynine white oak piles, and the application of a top dressing of crushed stone. The design of this dock, with concrete stairs at the side for the accommodation of small craft at all stages of the tide, has proved of great convenience to the public.

The small bath house near the steamboat dock has been repaired and steps thereto built.

Where necessary, crushed stone has been placed upon the drives and paths within the park and upon the right-of-way from the highway.

Cannon in Front of Memorial Arch. In December, 1911, the New York State Society of the Daughters of the Revolution, donors of the stone Memorial Arch at the entrance to the park, donated a cannon and pyramid of cannon balls which were placed in front of the piers, on the west side of the arch.

Number of Visitors. The increasing popularity of Stony Point is indicated by the increased number of visitors. From April 1, 1911, to April 1, 1912, the number of visitors actually counted by the keeper was 17,043. The number above given, however, does not indicate the actual number of visitors, for the reason that there are no turnstiles at the entrances and the number who escape the observation of the keeper is unknown.

Next to its picturesque location on the Hudson River and the historical interest attaching to this reservation, the chief charm of the park is the naturalness and simplicity with which it has been improved and maintained. Every effort has been made to avoid artificialities, and where they have been necessary, the aim has been to make them blend with the landscape as much as possible. The construction of the keeper's house and summer houses of random rubble stone-work and natural colored wood causes them to harmonize with their surroundings and not to strike discordant

notes in the scenes of which they are parts. The Society has also excluded all meretricious attractions, and no amusement paraphernalia or refreshment booths have been erected.

Stony Point is one of the very few public parks, by means of which the people of the State can get access to the actual water's edge of the famous Hudson River, without trespassing on private property. In the City of New York the right of way of the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad intervenes between Riverside Park and the river, and only in Fort Washington Park can the public approach the water's edge. On the west side of the river, the Palisades Interstate Park gives access to the water; and the same may be said of the United States Military Reservation at West Point. With these exceptions, so far as diligent inquiry discloses, the Stony Point State Park, with the adjacent United States Lighthouse Reservation of nine acres, is the only place where the public may freely enjoy itself at the waterside of this beautiful river; and the wisdom of the Legislature in creating the park and giving to the people this privilege is receiving increasing appreciation as time goes on. [See plates 1 and 2.]

Financial Statement. Following is a statement of State funds received and disbursed from April 1, 1911, to April 1, 1912:

Chapter 512, Laws of 1910.
(Appropriation, $600.)

DEBIT.
Received from State Treasurer, previously reported.
June 30, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
Aug. 25, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
Oct. 25, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.

$300 00 100 00 100 00 100 00

$600 00

$300 00

CREDIT.
Disbursements previously reported...
Voucher. 1911.

5. June 23. Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, April, May....
6. Aug. 14. Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, June, July..
7. Oct.

Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, August, September.

100 00 100 00 100 00

$600 00

Chapter 513, Laws of 1910.
(Appropriation, $3,000.)

DEBIT.
Received from State Treasurer, previously reported...
June 30, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
July 24, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
Aug. 25, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
Noy. 1, 1911. Reeeived from State Treasurer.

$2,750 63

63 58 110 00 19 50 56 29

$3,000 00

$2,750 63

CREDIT.
Disbursements previously reported....
Voucher. 1911.
10.

June 23. E. 0. Rose & Co., seed, paint, etc...
11. June 23. Haverstraw Water Supply Co., water,

May 1, 1910 to May 1, 1911.. 12. July 14. C. T. Allison, carting and mounting six

13 58

50 00

cannon

65 00

[blocks in formation]

Chapter 810, Laws of 1911.
(Appropriation, $600.)

DEBIT.
Jan. 24, 1912. Received from State Treasurer.
Feb. 15, 1912. Received from State Treasurer
March 16, 1912. Received from State Treasurer.

$100 00 100 00 100 00

$300 00

Voucher.

1.

$100 00

2.

1912.

CREDIT.
Jan. 8. Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, October, Novem-

ber, 1911..
Feb. 10. Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, December, 1911

and January, 1912...
March 5. Wm. Ten Eyck, keeper, February, March,

1912.

100 00

3.

100 00

$300 00

Chapter 811, Laws of 1911.
(Appropriation, $3,000.)

DEBIT.
1, 1911. Received from State Treasurer..
18, 1911. Received from State Treasurer.
24, 1912. Received from State Treasurer.
15, 1912. Received from State Treasurer.

Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb.

$493 51

50 00 33 22 26 58

$603 31

Voucher.

1.

2.
3.

$163 71 329 80

1911.

CREDIT.
Oct. 27. C. T. Allison, balance account for fenders

for dock, etc...
Oct. 27. Wm. Parrott, pulling and driving piles..
Dec. 4. Haverstraw Water Supply Co., water

May 1, 1911 to May 1, 1912..
1912.
Jan. 8. Moses Rose, carting crushed stone....
Feb. 10. Tomkins Cove Stone Co., crushed stone..

50 OG

4.
5.

33 22 26 58

$603 31

WATKINS GLEN STATE RESERVATION.

Transfer of Jurisdiction. Watkins Glen State Reservation is located in the town of Dix, in Schuyler County, adjacent to the village of Watkins, at the head of Seneca Lake, and embraces the most picturesque part of the famous Watkins Glen. This reservation was created through the efforts of the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society by chapter 676 of the laws of 1906, and committed to the custody of this Society, after a previous and unsuccessful attempt to secure the establishment of the reservation by a special Commission.

After five years administration by this Society, during which it had practically completed the work of improving the Glen, the Legislature, by chapter 731 of the laws of 1911, transferred the custody of the reservation to a special Commission.

In order that the Legislature and the public may understand the instrumentality of the Society in securing the establishment of this reservation, the economy which the Society effected in the purchase of the property by the State, and the nature and extent of the improvements and restoration of the Glen during the Society's administration, it seems appropriate at this time to make a brief review of the history of the reservation.

Physical Description. Watkins Glen Reservation comprises a little more than 103 acres of land, lying in a narrow tract extending westward from Franklin street in the village of Watkins. From end to end, in an air line, it measures a little more than two miles, but owing to its windings, a walk from one end to the other is much longer.

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