Vermont History

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Vermont Historical Society., 1910 - Vermont

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Page 102 - Nicholas he pro pelled a boat on the Neva with his motor energized from batteries. Here again the demonstration failed and ceased for lack of an economical source of current. There is close rivalry as to dates between the physician in Russia and the blacksmith in Vermont, but both at least encountered the same fatal obstacle, the lack of cheap current. So far, moreover, electricity has made no triumphal entry into navigation, but at a time when his native State had not a single mile of steam railroad,...
Page 91 - The Hampshire Grants in particular, a country unpeopled and almost unknown in the last war, now abounds in the most active and rebellious race on the continent, and hangs like a gathering storm on my left.
Page 88 - From your accounts, he appears to be pursuing that line of conduct which of all others is most favorable to us. I mean acting in detachment. This conduct will certainly give room for enterprise on our part and expose his parties to great hazard. Could we be so happy as to cut one of them off, supposing it should not exceed four, five or six hundred men, it would inspirit the people and do away much of their present anxiety.
Page 107 - Persuaded that the salvation of the rights and liberties of America depends, under God, on the firm union of its inhabitants in a vigorous prosecution of the measures necessary for its safety, and convinced of the necessity of preventing the anarchy and confusion which attend the dissolution of the powers of Government...
Page 21 - Stickney called the meeting to order. The minutes of the last meeting were read by the secretary and on motion approved. The report of the treasurer, Henry F.
Page 88 - Could we be so happy as to cut one of them off, supposing it should not exceed four, five or six hundred men, it would inspirit the people and do away much of their present anxiety. In such an event they would lose sight of past misfortunes and, urged at the same time by a regard to their own security, they would fly to arms and afford every aid in their power.
Page 88 - Though our affairs for some days past have worn a dark and gloomy aspect, I yet look forward to a fortunate and happy change. I trust General Burgoyne's army will meet sooner or later an effectual check and, as I suggested before, that the success he has had will precipitate his ruin.
Page 107 - ... we, the freemen, freeholders, and inhabitants of the city and county of New York, being greatly alarmed at the avowed design of the ministry to raise a revenue in America...
Page 81 - I should be glad if a few hills of corn unhoed should not be a motive sufficient to detain men at home, considering the loss of such an important post might be irretrievable.
Page 107 - ... several arbitrary and oppressive acts of the British Parliament, until a reconciliation between Great Britain and America, on constitutional principles, (which we most ardently desire,) can be obtained ; and that we will, in all things, follow the advice of our general committee, respecting the purposes aforesaid, the preservation of peace and good order, and the safety of individuals and private property.

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