Waverley - Heart of Midlothian

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Robert Cadell, Edinburgh; and Whittaker & Company London., 1833
 

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Page 52 - Hounds are in their couples yelling, Hawks are whistling, horns are knelling, Merrily merrily mingle they, 'Waken, lords and ladies gay.' Waken, lords and ladies gay...
Page 12 - Without being so presumptuous as to hope to emulate the rich humour, pathetic tenderness, and admirable tact, which pervade the works of my accomplished friend, I felt that something might be attempted for my own country of the same kind with that which Miss Edgeworth so fortunately achieved for Ireland...
Page 248 - Say then, that he was wise as brave, As wise in thought as bold in deed; For in the principles of things He sought his moral creed. Said generous Rob, " What need of Books ? Burn all the statutes and their shelves ! They stir us up against our kind, And worse, against ourselves.
Page 202 - ... for payment of which you are now prosecuted. The papers relating to the transaction are in the hands of Mr. , a writer, (or attorney,) who is now retired from professional business, and resides at Inveresk, near Edinburgh. He was a person whom I employed on that occasion, for a particular reason, but who never on any other occasion transacted business on my account. It is very possible...
Page 249 - For why ? — because the good old rule Sufficeth them, the simple plan, That they should take, who have the power, And they should keep who can.
Page 202 - When he came there he waited on the gentleman mentioned in the dream, a very old man ; without saying anything of the vision, he inquired whether he remembered having conducted such a matter for his deceased father. The old gentleman could not at first bring the circumstance to his recollection, but, on mention of the Portugal piece of gold, the whole returned upon his memory ; he made an immediate search for the papers, and recovered them ; so that Mr. Rutherford carried to Edinburgh the documents...
Page 202 - Mr. R d awakened in the morning with all the words of the vision imprinted on his mind, and thought it worth while to ride across the country to Inveresk, instead of going straight to Edinburgh. When he came there, he waited on the gentleman mentioned in the dream, a very old man ; without saying anything of the vision, he inquired whether he remembered having conducted such a matter for his deceased father.
Page 114 - ... also by about fifteen dragoons, who stood by him to the last. But after a faint fire, the regiment in general was seized with a panic ; and though their Colonel and some other gallant officers did what they could to rally them once or twice, they at last took a precipitate flight. And just in the moment when Colonel Gardiner seemed to be making a pause to deliberate what duty required him to do in such...
Page 53 - You shall see him brought to bay, " Waken, lords and ladies gay." Louder, louder chant the lay, Waken, lords and ladies gay ; Tell them, youth, and mirth, and glee, Run a course as well as we, Time, stern huntsman ! who can baulk, Stanch as hound, and fleet as hawk? Think of this, and rise with day, Gentle lords and ladies gay.
Page 24 - Scott as much as owned himself the Author of Waverley to me in Murray's shop. I was talking to him about that novel, and lamented that its author had not carried back the story nearer to the time of the Revolution - Scott, entirely off his guard, replied, "Ay, I might have done so; but -

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