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THERE are two classes of history, each of which has claims upon our attention peculiarly its own. One is a sober teacher, the other a pleasant companion. One opens new paths of thought, the other throws new light upon the old, and both agree in making man the chief object of their meditations.

Nearly two thousand years ago a Roman historian likened the life of his country to the life of man. Time has confirmed a the parallel. Nations, like men, have their infancy and their youth, their robust manhood and their garrulous old age. Their lives like the lives of men are full of encouragement and of warning. Interpret them aright and they become trusty guides. Misapply their lessons and you grope in the dark and stumble at every step.

And both states and men have their special duties and were created for special ends. The God that made them assigned to each its problem, and to work this out is to work out His will. Of this problem history is the record and the interpreter. It tells us what man has been, and thereby aids us to divine what he yet may be.

If with the philosopher history reveals the laws of life, with the poet she recalls the past and stirs human sympathies in their profoundest depths. Man follows man on her checkered stage; nations rise and fall; mysteries enchain us; imagination controls us; reason guides us; conscience admonishes and

warns; and first and foremost of all our stimulants to action is our sympathy with our fellow-man. I have attempted in the following pages to tell what the part of Rhode Island has been in this great drama. A talent was entrusted to her. Did she wrap it in a napkin? To those who are familiar with the accurate and exhaustive work of Governor Arnold, it will be needless to say that but for the aid of his volumes, mine would never have been written.

GEORGE W. GREENE.

WINDMILI, Cottage,
East Greenwich, R. I., April 8th, 1877.

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CONDITION OF AFFAIRS IN MASSACHUSETTS BAY AND PLYMOUTH COLONIES.—ARRIVAL AND BANISHMENT OF ROGER WILLIAMS.

1631.

1635.

Page.

The religious sentiment connected with the found-
ation of states, . e - e

Resistance to the doctrine of theocracy occa-
sioned the settlement of Rhode Island,

Ship Lyon arrived at Boston, bringing Roger

Williams, - - e
Early life of Williams, . - e
Massachusetts in possession of two distinct colo-

nies, - - - e

In Massachusetts Colony the clergy were virtu-
ally rulers, and they were extremely rigid,
Disputes between Williams and the authorities
of Massachusetts Bay Colony, -
Removal of Williams to Plymouth, . -
Williams makes friendship with Massasoit and

Miantonomi, - - e
Learns the Indian language, e e
Williams returns to Salem, - o
He is persecuted and finally banished, e
Articles of banishment, . - -

CHAPTER II.

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SUFFERINGS OF ROGER WILLIAMS IN THE WILDERNESS.– FOUNDS A SETTLEMENT ON THE SEEKONK RIVER-IS ADVISED TO DEPART.-SEEKS OUT A NEW PLACE WHICH HE CALLS PROVIDENCE.

Attempt to send Williams to England, -
His flight, - - - -
He is fed by the Indians, - - e

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He is given land on the Seekonk River by Mas”
soit and starts a settlement, - ... 8

He receives a friendly letter from the Governor
of Plymouth asking him to remove, . 9

He starts with five companions in a canoe to
find a place for a settlement, and finally
lands at Providence, - - . 9

CHAPTER III.

WILLIAMS OBTAINS A GRANT OF LAND AND FOUNDS A colony. —FORM OF GOVERNMENT IN TII E COLONY.—W II, LIAMS GOES To ENGLAND TO OBTAIN A ROYAL CHARTER.

Early inhabitants of Rhode Island, . . 11
Williams makes peace between Canonicus and

..., Massasoit, - - - . 12 \! He receives a grant of land from Canonicus and begins a settlement, - - . 12 Compact of the colonists at Providence, . 13 Experiment of separation of church from state tried in the new Colony, - - 13

The right of suffrage not regarded as a natural
right. Illustrated by Joshua Verin and his

wife, - - • e . 14

1639. The first church founded in Providence, . 15 Five select men appointed to govern the Colony, subject to the action of the Monthly Town

Meeting, - - e . 15 Massachusetts Colony applied for a new charter

to cover the land occupied by Providence, . 15 1643. Providence in connection with Aquidneck and Warwick sent Williams to England to obtain

a Royal charter, - - - 15 1644. Williams returns in 1644 successsful, and is received with exultation, - - 16

CHAPTER IV. SETTLEMENT OF AQUIDNECK AND WARWICK.-PEQUOT WAR.— DEATH OF MIANTONOMI.

1637. Anna Hutchinson arrived in Massachusetts and banished, . - - - 17

Nineteen of her followers under William Coddington and John Clarke, purchased the Island of Aquidneck and formed settlements

at Pocasset and Newport, - Roger Williams proclaimed the right of religious liberty to every human being,

Samuel Gorton banished from Pocasset,
He denied the authority of all government ex-
cept that authorized by the King and Parlia-

ment, - - - He, with eleven others, bought Shawomet and settled there,

He is besieged by troops from Massachusetts, is captured, imprisoned, and afterwards released, . - - - He is appointed to a magistracy in Aquidneck, Roger Williams prevented the alliance of the Pequots and Narragansetts, and formed one between the English and the Narragansetts,

Pequots rooted out and crushed,

Miantonomi treacherously put to death,

The Narragansetts put themselves under the protection of the English, - e

Page.

17 18 19 19 19

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T CHAPTER V.

charter GRANTED TO PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS.—ORGAN

1643.

1647.

IZATION UNDER IT.--THE LAWS ADOPTED.

The charter granted to Providence Plantations,
Provisions of the charter,
The corporators met at Portsmouth and in a
general assembly accepted the charter, and
proceeded to organize under it, -
The government declared to be democratical, .

President and other officers chosen, -
Description of the code of laws,
Design for a seal adopted, - -

Roger Williams presented with one hundred
pounds for services in obtaining the charter,
Spirit of the law,

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