Encyclopædia metropolitana; or, Universal dictionary of knowledge, ed. by E. Smedley, Hugh J. Rose and Henry J. Rose. [With] Plates, Volume 10

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Page 291 - It is not uncommon for those who have grown wise by the labour of others to add a little of their own, and overlook their masters. Addison is now despised by some who perhaps would never have seen his defects but by the lights which he afforded them.
Page 27 - So he and his sons fled into the mountains, and left all that ever they had in the city. Then many that sought after justice and judgment went down into the wilderness, to dwell there: both they, and their children, and their wives, and their cattle; because afflictions increased sore upon them.
Page 94 - Albeit in these days, the depths of that old learning are rarely fathomed, and yet it were happy for these lands, if our young nobility and gentry, instead of modern maxims, would imbibe the notions of the great men of antiquity. But in these freethinking times many an empty head is shook at Aristotle and Plato, as well as at the Holy Scriptures. And the writings of those celebrated ancients are by most men treated on a foot with the dry and barbarous lucubrations of the schoolmen.
Page 27 - Ananias, Azarias, and Misael, by believing were saved out of the flame. Daniel for his innocency was delivered from the mouth of lions.
Page 32 - Judas' friends came together, and said unto Jonathan, since thy brother Judas died, we have no man like him to go forth against our enemies, and Bacchides, and against them of our nation that are adversaries to us.
Page 273 - Urbanus for the year 709 ; and he was holding that office when he resolved to become the assassin of the man whose government he had twice acknowledged, by consenting himself to act in a public station under it. Sir Matthew Hale did well to accept the place of judge during the usurpation of Cromwell ; but what should we think of him if, whilst filling that office, he had associated himself with Colonel Titus, and other such wretches, in their plans to remove the protector by assassination ? C. Cassius...
Page 94 - It might very well be thought serious trifling to tell my readers that the greatest men had ever a high esteem for Plato ; whose writings are the touchstone of a hasty and shallow mind...
Page 275 - Plin., 7, 25), and to have made prisoners a million more, many of whom were destined to perish as gladiators, and all were torn from their country and reduced to slavery. The slaughter which he occasioned in...
Page 272 - Cloditis to annex that island to the Roman Empire. It appears, however, that he did not copy the example of Cato's integrity ; for having become the creditor of the citizens of Salamis to a large amount,§ he employed one M.
Page 283 - These sceptical topics, indeed, are only sufficient to prove, that the senses alone are not implicitly to be depended on ; but that we must correct their evidence by reason, and by considerations derived from the nature of the medium, the distance of the object, and the .disposition of the organ, in order to render them, within their sphere, the proper criteria of truth and falsehood.

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