Hermes Britannicus: A Dissertation on the Celtic Deity, Teutates, the Mercurius of Caesar, in Further Proof and Corroboration of the Origin and Designation of the Great Temple at Abury, in Wiltshire

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J. B. Nichols and son, 1828 - Avebury (England) - 149 pages
 

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Page 100 - As the waters fail from the sea, And the flood decayeth and drieth up : So man lieth down, and riseth not. Till the heavens be no more, they shall not awake, Nor be raised out of their sleep.
Page 99 - For now should I have lain still and been quiet: I should have slept; then had I been at rest: With kings and counsellors of the earth, which built desolate places for themselves...
Page 97 - Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book! That they were graven with an iron pen and lead in the rock for ever!
Page 22 - I will make the land of Egypt desolate in the midst of the countries that are desolate, and her cities among the cities that are laid waste shall be desolate forty years: and I will scatter the Egyptians among the nations, and will disperse them through the countries.
Page 98 - For inquire, I pray thee, of the former age, and prepare thyself to the search of their fathers : (For we are but of yesterday, and know nothing, because our days upon earth are a shadow:) Shall not they teach thee, and tell thee, and utter words out of their heart?
Page 100 - My days are swifter than a post: They are passed away as the swift ships : as the eagle that hasteth to the prey.
Page 22 - Tarshish was thy merchant by reason of the multitude of all kind of riches; with silver, iron, tin, and lead, they traded in thy fairs.
Page 54 - Have ye not known? Have ye not heard? Hath it not been told you from the beginning? Have ye not understood from the foundations of the earth? It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in; that bringeth the princes to nothing; he maketh the judges of the earth as vanity.
Page 68 - Dost thou not behold, Malvina, a rock with its head of heath? Three aged pines bend from its face ; green is the narrow plain at its feet; there the flower of the mountain grows, and shakes its white head in the breeze. The thistle is there alone, shedding its aged beard. Two stones, half sunk in the ground, show their heads of moss. The deer of the mountain avoids the place, for he beholds a dim ghost standing there.* The mighty lie, O Malvina! in the narrow plain of the rock.

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