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IV

LIST OF REPORTS

No. 13. Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Diego, and San Louis Obispo,

Date of Calif.:

Issue Part 1, Los Angeles and Long Beach, Calif..

1936 Part 2, San Diego and San Luis Obispo, Calif.

1936 No. 14. Port Arthur, Sabine, Beaumont, and Orange, Tex..

1940 No. 15. Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Newport News, Va.

1934 No. 16. Baltimore, Md...

1939 No. 17. Ports of the Territory of Hawaii...

1935 No. 18. Ports of Southern New England..

1937 No. 19. Pascagoula and Gulfport, Miss.

1934 No. 20. New York.

1932 No. 21. Ports of Puerto Rico.--.

1935 No. 22. Panama Canal and Its Ports.-

1938 No. 23. Olympia and Port Angeles, Wash...

1932 No. 24. Ports of Northern New England.--

1934 No. 25. Ports on the Upper Hudson River.

1936 No. 26. Stockton and Sacramento, Calif...

1936 No. 27. Tacoma, Wash..

1938 No. 28. Everett, Bellingham, and Grays Harbor, Wash.

1938 No. 29. Wilmington, Del.--

1938 No. 30. Ports on the Delaware River below and above Philadelphia, Pa. 1938 No. 31. Lake Charles, La --

1938 No. 32. Astoria, Oreg., and Longview and Vancouver, Wash..-

1940 No. 33. Wilmington, N. C.--

1940

LAKE SERIES

No. 1. Buffalo, N. Y..
No. 2. Detroit, Mich.
No. 3. Milwaukee, Wis.-
No. 4. Chicago, Ill.-
No. 5. Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 6. Duluth-Superior, Minn. and Wis_
No. 7. Toledo, Ohio..
No. 8. Sandusky, Huron, and Lorain, Ohio.----
No. 9. Fairport, Ashtabula, and Conneaut, Ohio.---

1939 1939 1939 1939 1939 1939 1939 1939 1939

TRANSPORTATION SERIES

No. 1. Transportation on the Great Lakes...
No. 2. Transportation in the Mississippi and Ohio Valleys.
No. 3. Transportation Lines on the Great Lakes.-
No. 4. Transportation Lines on the Mississippi River System.---
No. 5. Transportation Lines on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts.-

1937 1929 1941 1941 1940

MISCELLANEOUS SERIES

1940 1941

No. 1. Port and Terminal Charges at United States Sea Ports...

Supplement.
No. 2. Shipping Charges at United States and Foreign Ports: Consular

Services and Charges.---
No. 3. Foreign Trade Zones or Free Ports.---
No. 4. Ports and Terminal Charges at United States Great Lakes Ports.

Supplement..

1928 1929 1940 1941

WAR DEPARTMENT,
THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,

Washington, D. C., August 30, 1941.
Subject: Report on The Ports of the Territory of Hawaii.
To: The Chief of Engineers, United States Army.

1. There is transmitted herewith a report on the port facilities at The Ports of the Territory of Hawaii, prepared by the Statistical Division of the board. The report has been compiled especially for the use of the Ocean Shipping, War Trade, and Transportation Sections of the Liaison Division of the Army and Navy Munitions Board, on which the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors is represented by the resident member of the board.

2. The report follows the outline of the Port Series reports, but its scope is confined to the physical features of the port facilities as treated under the chapter headings of port and harbor conditions, fuel and supplies, and port and harbor facilities.

3. On account of the value of the information to the agencies having to do with problems in connection with the national defense, it is recommended that the report be printed, with the accompanying illustrations. For the Board:

EARL, NORTH,
Colonel, Corps of Engineers,

Resident Member of the Board.

(First endorsement]

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

August 30, 1941. To the BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,

Washington, D. C. Approved.

J. L. SCHLEY,

Major General,
Chief of Engineers.

VI

PORT AND HARBOR CONDITIONS

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Territory of Hawaii consists of eight principal islands, Oahu, Maui, Hawaii, Kauai, Lanai, Molakai, Niihau, and Kahoolawe, the first four named being by far the more important in the group. Honolulu, the capital of the Territory and the chief city, is situated

the south coast of the island of Oahu and is 2,091 nautical miles from San Francisco, 3,394 miles from Yokahama, 4,420 miles from Sydney, 4,767 miles from Manila, and 4,685 miles from Panama.

The project for improvement of Honolulu Harbor by the United States provides for an entrance channel 400 feet deep and 500 feet wide, for easing the curve where the entrance channel joins the inner harbor, for deepening the harbor basin to 35 feet for a general width of 1,520 feet, and for dredging along the reserved channel a channel 35 feet deep, 1,000 feet wide, and 1,000 feet long, and thence a channel of the same depth along the northerly side of the reserved channel 400 feet wide and about 3,000 feet long connecting Honolulu Harbor with Kapalama Basin. On September 30, 1940 there was a controlling depth of 40 feet at mean lower low water in the entrance channel, and a controlling depth of 35 feet in the harbor basin and the improved portion of the reserved channel. Kapalama Basin has a depth of about 15 feet at mean lower low water.

TIDES AND TIDAL CURRENTS

The mean range of tides is 1.9 feet and the extreme range 2.3 feet. Tidal currents are negligible.

ANCHORAGES

There are no anchorages in the harbor, but good holding grounds are found just outside the entrance channel. There are no mooring buoys.

BRIDGES

There are no bridges across any part of the harbor and no navigable streams enter it.

FUEL AND SUPPLIES

ELECTRIC CURRENT

The Hawaiian Electric Co. supplies 60-cycle alternating current to the water front in voltages of 11,000, 2,300, or 220–440, 3 phase, and 120–220 volts 1 phase. Information regarding the availability of current for vessel use is given in the table on piers, wharves, and docks,

page 7.

WATER SUPPLY

An ample supply of pure artesian water is available at all of the public wharves through city mains. The charge to vessels is 50 cents per 1,000 gallons.

COAL BUNKERING

There are no coal bunkering facilities at Honolulu.

OIL BUNKERING

The Shell Oil Co., the Standard Oil Co. of California, the Tidewater Associated Oil Co., and the Union Oil Co. all have storage tanks at the port in which a normal supply of approximately 260,000 barrels of fuel and Diesel oil and 28,000 barrels of refined oil is maintained, the maximum quantities kept in stock at any time being approximately 506,000 and 95,000 barrels, respectively. Although the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Co. does not have oil storage facilities at the port, it has installed and operates an extensive fuel distribution system for use of the public and all oil companies. This system is located at the rear of and forms a part of piers 29 and 29-X, which are shown in the table on piers, wharves, and docks and on the port facilities map under reference No. 29. The fuel-oil bunkering facilities of the four oil companies at the port can be connected with this distribution system and all of the fuel oil facilities in the harbor can be connected and used as a unit if necessary.

The following is a list of the piers open to public use at which bunker oil can be obtained by vessels, with information relative to the pipe lines at each facility:

Territory of Hawaii Nos. 7, 8, and 9 (reference Nos. 9, 10, and 11): One 6-inch Diesel and two 8-inch

fuel oil lines on each facility. Nos. 10 and 11 (reference Nos. 12 and 13): Two 8-inch fuel lines on each. No. 12 (reference No. 14): This pier has been leased by the Inter-Island Steam

Navigation Co. and one 6-inch pipe line will be installed thereon.
Nos. 13 and 14 (reference No. 15): One 6-inch pipe line.
No. 15 (reference No. 16): One 8-inch pipe line.

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