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PORT AND HARBOR CONDITIONS

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Hilo is situated on the east coast of Hawaii, the largest island of the group. It is 200 miles southeastward of Honolulu and is the second port of the Territory in volume of shipping.

The entrance to Hilo Harbor is in deep water from the north, between a coral reef and the west shore; thence it turns at a right angle to the eastward and follows inside the reef to Kuhio Bay. The existing project for improvement of the harbor provides for a rubble mound breakwater 10,170 feet long (or shorter if found adequate), for the removal of shoals at the entrance to Kuhio Bay to a depth of 35 feet, and for dredging an area in Kuhio Bay 1,400 feet wide, about 2,300 feet long, and 35 feet deep. The project has been completed with a breakwater 10,070 feet long. The controlling depth is 35 feet except for small areas along the project line. All depths are referred to the plane of mean lower low water,

TIDES

The range of tide between mean lower low water and mean higher high water is 2.3 feet and the extreme range under ordinary conditions is 3.2 feet.

TIDAL CURRENTS

While the tidal currents are negligible, there is frequently a heavy swell which is deflected eastward by the west shore and causes a considerable surge at the wharves.

ANCHORAGES

Anchorage can be had any where under the lee of the breakwater in up to 7 fathoms. A good anchorage from 5 to 6 fathoms with good holding ground is from % mile 270° true (W. by S. mag.) from Kaulainaiwi Island. After heavy rains a current setting northward from Waiakea Creek is felt in this vicinity. For deep draft vessels the harbor master usually assigns an anchorage.

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FUEL AND SUPPLIES

ELECTRIC CURRENT

Wharves Nos. 1 and 2 are supplied with electric current of 440 volts, 60 cycles, 3-phase for lighting but are not equipped with connections for supplying current for vessel use.

WATER SUPPLY

All three wharves have pipe lines for supplying water to vessels. City water is supplied at a charge of 46 cents per 1,000 gallons, 40 cents for water and 6 cents for the Territorial wharf toll.

OIL BUNKERING

The Hawaii Consolidated Railway, Ltd., controls the bunkering facilities at the port. This company has two steel tanks with a total capacity of 35,000 barrels. California oil is received from the Matson Line steamers through one 10-inch pipe line, a normal supply of 20,000 barrels being available and a maximum of 33,000 barrels. This company has another 20,000-barrel tank on order which is expected to be installed by December 1941.

Fuel oil is supplied to vessels at piers 1 and 2 through 10-inch pipe lines at the rate of 250 to 300 barrels per hour. Pier 3 is also equipped with pipe lines for fuel oil, Diesel oil, kerosene, and gasoline.

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AERIAL VIEW OF PIERS, HILO HARBOR, HAWAU, T. H. PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS

There are three piers at the port, all of which are owned and operated by the Territorial Board of Harbor Commissioners.

Pier No. 1 is 1,172 feet in length and has a transit shed measuring 1,075 feet in length and 145 feet in width. The pier has 2 surface tracks on the apron 2,320 feet long and 2 depressed tracks inside the transit shed 2,150 feet long. In addition to a 3-inch water main it has one 10-inch fuel oil line, one 8-inch molasses line, and one 4-inch bitumuls line.

Pier No. 2 measures 549 by 173 feet on the lower side and has a transit shed 374 by 77 feet in length. Pier No. 3 is 635 feet long. Each of these piers has 2 surface railroad tracks, and water, oil, and molasses lines.

Additional data on the facilities at Hilo are shown in the following table: 418781-414-8

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