Church-State Cooperation Without Domination: A New Paradigm for Church-State Relations

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Xlibris Corporation, Jun 25, 2010 - Political Science - 288 pages
Church-State Cooperation Without Domination os a historical review highlighting the antecedents leading up to present day church-state relations in the United States. Successful models of cooperation between government and faith-based agencies are described with the final chapter suggesting a new model for church-state relations that protects religious freedom while preserving the principle of limited government involvement with religion. It isn't a question of if or should government and religion mix. They already do, but there is little consensus on how to balance separation and cooperation. This book addresses those issues.
 

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Contents

Overview
1
Quest
15
The Model
189
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Truett was born in St. Joseph, Missouri where his father was district missionary for the Missouri Baptist Convention. After graduation from OBU, he attended Southwestern and Midwestern Baptist Seminaries and graduated with a master of divinity degree in 1962. After serving eleven years as pastor of churches in Oklahoma and Missouri, Truett completed his formal education with a master's degree in social work. From 1974 until retirement in 1999, he worked in Christian Social Ministry, rounding out his career with a fi fteen year tenure as president of Arizona Baptist Children's Services. Truett was elected president of both state and national organizations in his career field. He taught social work as an adjunct professor in the Graduate School of Social Work at Arizona State University. Honors included Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Arizona State University School of Social Work, and the Arizona Council of Human Service Providers. Truett was awarded an honorary Doctor of Human Services Degree.His publications include several articles and two books in the fields of social work and genealogy.

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