Confucius to Cummings: An Anthology of Poetry

Front Cover
Ezra Pound, Marcella Spann
New Directions Publishing, 1964 - Poetry - 353 pages
This anthology is Ezra Pound's own choice of the poetry of various ages and cultures--ranging from his translations of the Confucian Odes up to E. E. Cummings--which he considered the finest of its type. It is a statement by example of the "Pound critical canon" and, as such, a short course in the history of world poetry, useful alike for the student and the general reader. Nearly a hundred poets are represented, a number of them in Pound's own translations, with emphasis on the Greek and Latin, Chinese, Troubadour, Renaissance, and Elizabethan. Of particular interest are the notes on certain of the poems and poets which Pound supplied in comment on his selections.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CONFUCIUS c 551479 B C
3
HOMER c 950900 B C
15
from WOMEN OF TRACHIS
22
CATULLUS 78454? B C
33
RUTILIUS A 416 A D
67
GODESCHALK 805869
75
BERTRANS DE BORN c 11401214
80
ST FRANCIS OF ASSISI 11821226
86
CHRISTOPHER SMART 17221771
179
ROBERT BURNS 17591796
197
FITZGREENE HALLECK 17901867
206
JOHN KEATS 17951821
211
JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER 18071892
218
HERMAN MELVILLE 18191891
256
DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI 18281882
271
FRANCIS BRET HARTE 18361902
274

DANTE ALIGHIERI 12651321
96
ANONYMOUS c 1300
100
CHARLES DORLÉANS 13911465
108
LORENZO DE MEDICI THE MAGNIFICENT 14491492
118
The Holly
123
15331603
129
A W A 1585
136
ANONYMOUS c 1600
142
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 15641616
148
BEN JONSON 15721637
173
THOMAS HARDY 18401928
283
FORD MADOX FORD 18731939
290
PADRAIC COLUM 18811972
305
WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS 18831963
307
E E CUMMINGS 18941963
316
A Note on Hardy and Ford by Ezra Pound
325
Questions for Classroom Use by Ezra Pound
335
Index of Poets and Translators
343
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1964)

New Directions has been the primary publisher ofEzra Pound in the U.S. since the founding of the press when James Laughlin published New Directions in Prose and Poetry 1936. That year Pound was fifty-one. In Laughlin's first letter to Pound, he wrote: Expect, please, no fireworks. I am bourgeois-born (Pittsburgh); have never missed a meal. . . . But full of 'noble caring' for something as inconceivable as the future of decent letters in the US." Little did Pound know that into the twenty-first century the fireworks would keep exploding as readers continue to find his books relevant and meaningful.

Bibliographic information