The Edinburgh Journal of Science, Volume 9

Front Cover
William Blackwood, 1828 - Science
 

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 338 - While examining the form of these particles immersed in water, I observed many of them very evidently in motion; their motion consisting not only of a change of place in the fluid, manifested by alterations in their relative positions, but also not...
Page 328 - ... by the side of the fall. Thousands died, but their bodies remaining moist, served as the ladder for others to make their way ; and I saw some ascending even perpendicular stones, making their road through wet moss, or adhering to some eels that had died in the attempt. Such is the energy of these little animals, that they continue to find their way, in immense numbers, to Loch Erne. The same thing...
Page 326 - Nazareit and Reiti. The highest lake fed by melted snows, in March, when I saw it, was bright blue. It discharged itself by a small stream into another, into which a number of large pines had been blown by a winter storm ; or fallen from some other cause : in this lake its colour was blue green.
Page 250 - Deception, which is so often recommended by writers on the theory of painting, instead of advancing the art, is in reality carrying it back to its infant state...
Page 250 - Amongst our Igloolik acquaintances, were two female and a few male wizards, of whom the principal was Toolemak. This personage was cunning and intelligent, and, whether professionally, or from his skill in the chase, but perhaps from both reasons, was considered by all the tribe as a man of importance.
Page 329 - T. xiv. p. 70) says, that the little eels, according to his observation, are produced within reach of the tide, and climb round falls to reach fresh water from the sea. I have sometimes seen them, in spring, swimming in immense shoals in the Atlantic, in Mount Bay, making their way to the mouths of small brooks and rivers. When the cold water from the autumnal floods begins...
Page 330 - If viviparous, and the fringes contain the ova, one mother must produce tens of thousands, the ova being remarkably small; but it appears more probable, that they are oviparous,* and that they deposit their ova in parts of the sea near deep basins, which remain warm in winter. This might be ascertained by experiment, particularly on the coasts of the Mediterranean. I cannot find, that they haunt the Arctic ocean, which is probably of too low a temperature to suit their feelings or habits ; and the...
Page 329 - Lewenhoeck. — (Phil. Trans, vol. iv.) Eels migrate from the salt water of different sizes, but I believe never when they are above a foot long — and the great mass of them are only from two and a half to four inches. They feed, grow, and fatten in fresh water. In small rivers they...
Page 251 - Third edition. round, and, in a loud powerful voice, vociferated for Tornga with great impatience, at the same time blowing and snorting like a Walrus. His noise, impatience, and agitation, increased every moment, and he at length seated himself on the deck, varying his tones, and making a rustling with his clothes. "Suddenly the voice seemed smothered, and was so managed as to sound as if retreating beneath the deck, each moment becoming more distant, and ultimately giving the idea of being many...
Page 335 - ... that this effect was independent of the conducting power of the rod, whether good or bad. The amount of inflection or repulsion was directly as the mass, and inversely as the distance from the flame. It was not diminished by increasing the temperature of the rod, even to such a degree as to render it scarcely possible for it to abstract any of the caloric. In fact, when two flames are made to approach each other, there is a mutual repulsion, although their proximity increases the temperature...

Bibliographic information