A General Treatise on Cattle, the Ox, the Sheep, and the Swine: Comprehending Their Breeding, Management, Improvement, and Diseases...

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Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1809 - Cattle - 618 pages
 

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Page 72 - At the first appearance of any person, they set off in full gallop ; and, at the distance of two or three hundred yards, make a wheel round, and come boldly up again, tossing their heads in a menacing manner ; on a sudden, they make a full stop, at the distance of forty or fifty yards, looking wildly at the object of their surprise ; but upon the least motion being made they all again turn round, and fly off...
Page 73 - ... its head, it got up, pawed two or three times like an old bull, bellowed very loud, retired a few steps, and bolted at his legs with all its force; it then began to paw again, bellowed, stepped back, and bolted as before; but knowing its intention, and stepping...
Page 71 - Their colour is invariably of a creamy white; muzzle black; the whole of the inside of the ear, and about one-third of the outside, from the tips downwards, red; horns white, with black tips, very fine, and bent upwards; some of the bulls have a thin upright mane, about an inch and a half or two inches long.
Page 72 - The mode of killing them was, perhaps, the only modern remains of the grandeur of ancient hunting. On notice being given that a wild bull would be killed upon a certain day, the inhabitants of the neighbourhood came...
Page 71 - Their colour is invariably white, muzzle black ; the whole of the inside of the ear, and about one-third of the outside from the tip, downwards, red ; horns white, with black tips, very fine, and bent upwards ; some of the bulls have a thin upright mane, about an inch and a half, or two inches long...
Page 73 - ... though it made several efforts : but it had done enough •, the whole herd were alarmed, and coming to its rescue, obliged him to retire ; for the dams will allow no person to touch their calves, without attacking them with impetuous ferocity.* When any one happens to be wounded, or is grown weak and feeble through age or sickness, the rest of the herd set upon it, and gore it to death.
Page 73 - If any person come near the calves, they clap their heads close to the ground, and lie like a hare in form to hide themselves. This is a proof of their native wildness, and is corroborated by the following...
Page 73 - ... a few steps, and bolted at his legs with all its force ; it then began to paw again, bellowed, stepped back, and bolted as before ; but knowing its intention, and stepping aside, it missed him, fell, and was so very weak that it could not rise, though it made several efforts. But it had done enough, the whole herd were alarmed, and coming to ВОУГОЖ.
Page 37 - These cattle have generally, for a century past, commanded the best price at Smithfield; but of late years, the buyers there have shrewdly remarked, that although blood and fine form are very pleasing to the eye of the gentleman breeder, yet substance and weight are, and ever must be, the grand objects at market.
Page 263 - ... should be quite full; the back and loins broad, flat, and straight, from which the ribs must rise with a fine circular arch ; his belly straight, the quarters long and full, with the mutton quite down to the hough, which should neither stand in nor out ; his twist...

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