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" Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. Our trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissors upon every plant and bush. "
The Athenaeum: A Magazine of Literary and Miscellaneous Information ... - Page 115
edited by - 1807
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Select British Classics, Volume 16

English literature - 1803
...without discovering what it is that has so agreeable an effect. Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. Our trees rise in cones,_globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every plant or bush. I do not know...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - English language - 1807
...from plantations of another kind. " Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of hu" mooring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible....Our trees rise in cones, globes and pyramids. We see ther " marks of the scissars on every plant and bush." These sentences are lively and elegant. - They...
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An English Grammar: Comprehending the Principles and Rules of the ..., Volume 2

Lindley Murray - English language - 1808
...themselves currap'jnd !•i each other, ne naturul/y expect to find a similar correspondence in the isords. OUR British gardeners, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. I have observed of late the style of some great ministers, very much to exceed that of any other productions....
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English Exercises, Adapted to Murray's English Grammar:: Consisting of ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1808 - 168 pages
...themselves correspond to each olhery we naturally expect to find a similar correifondence in the word». Our British gardeners, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. I have observed of late the style of some great minisUrs, very much to exceed that ot any other productions....
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The British Essayists;: Spectator

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1808
...without discovering .what it is that has so agreeable an effect. Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. eS Our trees-rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. W« sec the marks of the scissars upon every plant...
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The Spectator, Volume 7

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1810
...without discovering what it is that has so agreeable an effect. Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possi* ble. Our trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every...
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Lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - 1811
...distinguishes it from plantations of another kind, " Our British gardeners, on the contrary, in" stead of humouring nature, love to deviate from ** it as...globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of " the scissars on every plant and bush. THESE sentences are lively and elegant. They make an agreeable diversity from...
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English Exercises, Adapted to Murray's English Grammar: Consisting of ...

Lindley Murray - English language - 1814 - 192 pages
...we naturally expect to find a similar correspondence in the words. Grammar, p. 308. Key, p. 136. OCR British gardeners, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much. as possible. I have observed of late the style of some great ministers, very much to exceed that of any other productions....
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

Hugh Blair - English language - 1815 - 544 pages
...which distinguishes it from plantations of another kind. * Our British gardeners, on the contrary, instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from...globes and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars on every plant and bush.' These sentences are lively and elegant. They make an agreeable diversity...
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The beauties of The Spectator 2nd ed., revised and enlarged with The vision ...

Spectator The - 1816
...without discovering what it is that has so agreeable an effect. Our British gardeners , on the contrary , instead of humouring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. Our trees rise in cones , glohes and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissars upon every plant and bush. I do not .know whether...
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