Sartor Resartus

Front Cover
Ginn, 1900 - 432 pages
Thomas Carlyle's "Sartor Resartus" was an influential novel, and partakes of the 19th century conceit of the "found manuscript" variety, in this case a commentary on the thought and early life of a German philosopher called Diogenes Teufelsdröckh, with editorial asides and interjections. Teufelsdröckh has written an extensive treatise on clothes, which the editorial voice plumbs for a full measure of humor - of the extremely dry British variety. The novel contains much of the philosophy current in the early years of the Victorian Age, and the novel helps shed the light of understanding on that influential period of English history.
 

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User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

Even now that I've read it I'm not entirely sure what prompted me to pick this up at the library book sale this spring. Probably it was the back-cover text noting that the book was inspired in part by ... Read full review

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User Review  - wellred2 - LibraryThing

Sartor Resartvs written and fascimile signed by Thomas Carlyle. The inside pages as shown in the photo have Thomas Carlyle's autograph under a photo and the date that it was signed (1865). The oposite ... Read full review

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Page 270 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 281 - And unto this he frames his song: Then will he fit his tongue To dialogues of business, love, or strife; But it will not be long...
Page 267 - Come, my friends, Tis not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and sitting well in order smite The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho...
Page 289 - At thirty man suspects himself a fool ; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan ; At fifty chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve; In all the magnanimity of thought Resolves and re-resolves; then dies the same.
Page 157 - Fire!" is given: and they blow the souls out of one another: and in place of sixty brisk, useful craftsmen, the world has sixty dead carcasses, which it must bury, and anew shed tears for. Had these men any quarrel? Busy as the Devil is, not the smallest! They lived far enough apart: were the entirest strangers: nay. in so wide a Universe, there was even, unconsciously, by Commerce, some mutual helpfulness between them. How then? Simpleton! Their governors had fallen out: and instead of shooting...
Page 291 - Avaunt ! and quit my sight. Let the earth hide thee ! Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold ; Thou hast no speculation in those eyes, Which thou dost glare with.
Page xx - To conclude from all, what is man himself but a microcoat, or rather a complete suit of clothes with all its trimmings ? As to his body there can be no dispute ; but examine even the acquirements of his mind, you will find them all contribute in their order towards furnishing out an exact dress : to instance no more ; is not religion a cloak, honesty a pair of shoes worn out in the dirt, selflove a surtout, vanity a shirt, and conscience a pair of breeches, which, though a cover for lewdness as well...
Page 240 - Thus, like a God-created, fire-breathing Spirit-host, we emerge from the Inane; haste stormfully across the astonished Earth; then plunge again into the Inane. Earth's mountains are levelled, and her seas filled up, in our passage: can the Earth, which is but dead and a vision, resist Spirits which have reality and are alive? On the hardest adamant some foot-print of us is stamped in; the last Rear of the host will read traces of the earliest Van.
Page 332 - Why do they prate of the blessings of Peace? we have made them a curse, Pickpockets, each hand lusting for all that is not its own; And lust of gain, in the spirit of Cain, is it better or worse Than the heart of the citizen hissing in war on his own hearthstone?
Page 238 - Are we not Spirits, that are shaped into a body, into an Appearance ; and that fade away again into air and Invisibility ? This is no metaphor, it is a simple scientific fact : we start out of Nothingness, take figure, and are Apparitions ; round us, as round the veriest spectre, is Eternity ; and to Eternity minutes are as years and aeons.

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